(religion)-based as an adjective before noun

Peloam

Member
Urdu
Hello pals,

Can I say that some customs, norms, habits or superstitious beliefs are Islamic-based habits, Jewish-based habits or christian-based norms, etc?

I'm trying to say that some habits are not from Islam or Christianity but they have their origins in them, then they developed overtime to non-Islamic or non-Christian or non-Jewish, yet Jewish-based habits. I hope you direct me to saying this in a proper way.
 
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  • EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hello pals, Can I say that some customs, norms, habits or superstitious beliefs are Islamic-based habits, Jewish-based habits or christian-based norms, etc? I'm trying to say that some habits are not from Islam or Christianity but they have their origins in them, then they developed overtime to non-Islamic or non-Christian or non-Jewish, yet Jewish-based habits. I hope you direct me to saying this in a proper way.

    A combining form is a word which is joined with another word, usually with a hyphen, to form compounds, e.g. strawberry-flavored.

    In the dictionary the combining form -based is used in three ways:

    1) -based combines with nouns referring to places to mean something positioned or existing mainly in the place mentioned, or operating or organized from that place: ... a Washington-based organization. ... land-based missiles. [Which doesn't fit the bill here.]

    2) -based combines with nouns to mean that the thing mentioned is a central part or feature: ... computer-based jobs. ... oil-based sauces. [Which might fit the bill.]

    3) -based combines with adverbs to mean having a particular kind of basis: There are growing signs of more broadly-based popular unrest. [Is not what we're looking for.] (Collins dictionary, 2007)

    From this perspective of looking at the question of whether it is all right to say Islamic-based, Jewish-based, and Christian-based, I would say no, because Islamic, Jewish, and Christian are adjectives, not nouns.

    Would it then be okay to use the nouns that correspond to those adjectives - Islam, Judaism, and Christianity - as in Islam-based, Judaism-based, and Christianity-based? I'd say so.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I agree with ES's suggestion to use nouns for correct grammar.
    However, I'm a little confused by your intent

    I'm trying to say that some habits are not from Islam or Christianity but they have their origins in them

    If they "have their origins in" something, that means they "are derived (or come) from" that something.

    Perhaps you mean that some "X-derived habits/customs etc. are now practised by others outside the X religion?"
     

    Peloam

    Member
    Urdu
    Thank you for this explanation.

    I googled "christian-based norms" and found a very few examples, and googled Christianity-based norms and found none. I also found a very few results for "Islamic-based norms", but none for "Islam-based norms". Google search results are not the wisest to seek counsel from, I'm quite positive about it, but I just want to make sure from you by informing you of these results.


    I see JulianStuart's point. It should be Islam-derived habits or Christian-derived norms if people have altered them to something new. But if they comply with the teachings of the x religion, only then I can use x-based habits. This is what you wanted to say, right?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    But if they comply with the teachings of the x religion, only then I can use x-based habits. This is what you wanted to say, right?

    If they are the same as the habit in (x religion) then you should omit the word "based" and simply describe them as "(x religion) habits". Using the word "-based" implies that they are not the same as what they are "based on" but have been modified in some way.
     

    Peloam

    Member
    Urdu
    Now I understand you. No, I do not want to say that someone outside that x religion practices these x-based habits, I just want to say that 'Christians, Muslims, etc' practice habits which evolved from their own religious systems, thought these habits might have had undergone some changes and are now partially a new product "x-based habits". But this doesn't make the meaning you suggested wrong, right? I believe it is correct to use this "x-based" adjective if we want to say that a non-x practices x-based habits "even though he is not a/an x".



    The aching question is, as I said in a former post, most google results agree with x (as an adjective)-based something, but do not give results for x (as a noun)-based something. Today, an English friend said that I shouldn't say Islam-based habits but should say Islamic-based ones. Are both correct or has this not been decided yet in the English language, or is it that both forms are acceptable?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    All of the examples of -based as a suffix that I have seen are nouns except for the ones describing the base itself such as "broad-based". Examples of others are faith-based (particularly relevant :D ), paper-based, space-based, ground-based, oil-based, milk-based, soy-based etc. These are all synonymous with "based on/in the noun". I personally would go with a noun and specifically the name of the faith (Judaism, Christianity etc.).
     
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