relinquish / forfeit / renounce

Gamen

Banned
Spanish Argentina
Buenos días.

Realmente no sé el significado o uso concreto de los verbos "relinquish", "forfeit" y "renounce".
El diccionario da como términos equivalentes "renunciar", "ceder", no obstante creo que los verbos ingleses tiene un sentido más específico que los equivalentes españoles y se usan en contextos más acotados.

Lo que yo sé es lo siguiente, pero no estoy completamente seguro:

"Relinquish" es renunciar a un cargo. Abdicar (abdicate?)
"Forfeit" es entregar o ceder algo debido a una deuda.
"Renounce" es más general pero muy formal.

Ejemplos:
The king had to relinquish or renounce his throne and his privileged position to cede it to another person.
The judge forced the accused man to forfeit the stolen properties.
A sensible man must know how to renounce (formal) give up (más neutro) the mundane pleasures and vices that may corrupt or pervert him.

¿Los tres verbos han sido usados correctamente?
Agradezco sus comentarios o sugerencias.
 
Last edited:
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The judge forced the accused man to forfeit the stolen properties.

    Yo diría "relinquish" (o mejor "surrender").

    I don't think you can "forfeit" something that is not originally yours by right, at least potentially.

    A sensible man must know how to relinquish / renounce...

    There is a probably a slight difference in meaning here. "Relinquish" simply means to "give up"; "renounce" would imply that you made a conscious decision or declaration to separate yourself from pleasures as a matter of principle.
     

    Gamen

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you The Newt.
    I see the differences.
    Now then, ¿What thing can you forfeit? ¿Something that is yours? ¿Something that belongs to you?
    ¿For what reason would you have to forfeit something?
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank you The Newt.
    I see the differences.
    Now then, ¿What thing can you forfeit? ¿Something that is yours? ¿Something that belongs to you?
    ¿For what reason would you have to forfeit something?
    You could forfeit your right to win a contest, for example, if you didn't obey the rules. It's often used in sports; if one team doesn't show up, they forfeit the game. In those examples the forfeiture is involuntary. So a king might relinquish a throne voluntarily, but forfeit it by marrying a commoner, for example.

    There are also uses of the word in legal contexts but I'm less familiar with those.
     

    Gamen

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you very much The Newt. Now it is clearer to me. These are typical verbs that don't have an exact correspondence in Spanish and present such a limited meaning that sometimes it is difficult to use them well, with the precise scope they really have.
     
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