reluctant populations vs populations reluctant

I found the following sentence.
"European leaders used a variety of ways to encourage reluctant populations to adopt the potato."

In this sentence, an adjective "reluctant" is placed before a noun "populations". However, the meaning of this part is "populations who were reluctant to adopt the potato", so I wonder if "reluctant" and "to adopt the potato" can be separated in this way. The sentence below is possible?

"European leaders used a variety of ways to encourage populations reluctant to adopt the potato."
 
  • arundhati

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Hello,
    The two sentences are possible, they just don't have the same meaning.
    In the first one, the populations are reluctant , and the European Leaders used a variety of ways to encourage them to adopt the potato.
    In the second one, the populations are reluctant to adopt the potato, and the European Leaders used a variety of ways to encourage them.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    That changes the meaning. It makes “reluctant to adopt the potato” an adjective phrase and so leaves the sentence not telling us what such populations are being encouraged to do.


    slowly cross-posted
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    and so leaves the sentence not telling us what such populations are being encouraged to do.
    Yes, I agree.

    The original on the other hand tells us by implication what populations were reluctant to do--to start eating potatoes. It's a common enough structure.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You have different constructions.

    "[They] used a variety of ways to encourage reluctant...populations to adopt the potato."
    ".............................................................adjective..........noun
    [They] leaders used a variety of ways to encourage populations reluctant to adopt the potato." ->
    [They] leaders used a variety of ways to encourage populations that were reluctant to adopt the potato."
    ..............................................................................noun....[......................relative clause...........] Relative clauses are adjectival
     
    Hello,
    The two sentences are possible, they just don't have the same meaning.
    In the first one, the populations are reluctant , and the European Leaders used a variety of ways to encourage them to adopt the potato.
    In the second one, the populations are reluctant to adopt the potato, and the European Leaders used a variety of ways to encourage them.
    Thanks for the reply. I fully understood.
     
    You have different constructions.

    "[They] used a variety of ways to encourage reluctant...populations to adopt the potato."
    ".............................................................adjective..........noun
    [They] leaders used a variety of ways to encourage populations reluctant to adopt the potato." ->
    [They] leaders used a variety of ways to encourage populations that were reluctant to adopt the potato."
    ..............................................................................noun....[......................relative clause...........] Relative clauses are adjectival
    Thanks for the detailed explanation.
     
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