rely depend trust

Oliviaclouds

Senior Member
CHINESE
"rely depend trust" seem to have similar meaning.
Can anyone help me clarify the deferences of the three words, please?

I checked the meaning of "depend"---- to need the support, help, or existence of someone or something in order to exist, be healthy, be successful etc [= rely on]:
The country depends heavily on its tourist trade.

So actually here "depend on" and "rely on" are interchangeable.

But when "depend" means to trust or have confidence in someone or something"
You can depend on Jane - she always keeps her promises.

Is it interchangeable with "rely" or "trust"?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    But when "depend" means to trust or have confidence in someone or something"
    You can depend on Jane - she always keeps her promises.

    Is it interchangeable with "rely" or "trust"?

    It's interchangeable with both, though: 'depend on' = 'rely on' = 'trust' = ('trust in')

    We say that Jane is 'dependable', or 'reliable', or 'to be trusted'.

    Whereas, in the 'country depends on tourism' example, we would say that the country is 'dependent on tourism', or 'reliant on tourism'.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Generally speaking, rely and depend are interchangeable in meaning and usage: You rely on [OR depend on] your salary in order to pay your rent and buy your food. You can rely on [OR depend on] Jane to keep a secret. You could also use count on in these two sentences.

    Notice that these words are all used with on.

    You can use trust (no "on") instead of rely on or depend on in speaking about Jane in the example above, but not in the sentence about your pay. Also note that rely on and depend on are often followed by "for . . . " or "to . . . ". But you can simply say, "I trust Jane." That means that you believe Jane is an honest, reliable person.
     
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