remains - archaeological

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weristich

Senior Member
US and English
Hi everyone,

I am wondering if "remains" works in this sentece. The sentece is talking about chariots which have been found in Egypt.

To date, the remains of eleven chariots have been discovered in Egypt.
 
  • losvedir

    Senior Member
    English - California
    Hi everyone,

    I am wondering if "remains" works in this sentece. The sentece is talking about chariots which have been found in Egypt.

    To date, the remains of eleven chariots have been discovered in Egypt.
    That could work, although "remains" makes me think of human remains. For objects, like chariots, I might say "remnants" instead.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Remains" isn't quite right; like Losvedir, I think of bodies, whether human or animal. I think it likely that parts or fragments were found.
     

    weristich

    Senior Member
    US and English
    I didn't think "remains" was quite correct because I always have the association with human or animals as well. I will think on it some more. Parts, fragments, or pieces might work.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    To find the right word, we would need to know the state of the chariots. Are they nearly whole? In pieces? Almost dust?
     

    weristich

    Senior Member
    US and English
    To find the right word, we would need to know the state of the chariots. Are they nearly whole? In pieces? Almost dust?
    I don't know. I would assume mostly whole if the examples from King Tut's tomb are included among the eleven. There is no more context to help.
     

    weristich

    Senior Member
    US and English
    I could do that but as it is a translation (I probably should have stated that from the start) I need to keep the idea of "remains".
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    You probably have to start with some interpretation of remains..... Define your terms first....... Then post your definitions.

    Another problem that this is NOT a translation forum... so you 'ave a problem.....

    GF..

    Post it on one of the French forums......
     
    Last edited:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I am really surprised that you can't give us any source, let alone context, according to you. 'Context' includes why you are writing and composing these sentences. Now, items like remains/ left-overs/remnants/ the rest of ..., can be tricky for learners, especially as there are 'false-friend' words in other European languages. When people ask about these words they usually come up with an everyday example sentence such as :cross:" Nobody liked the food so we had many rests to throw away":cross:. It is very unusual to ask how to describe what's left of eleven Egyptian chariots! Perhaps you are trying too hard not to copy your source word for word.

    One of my major leisure interests is archaeology. I wanted to be an archaeologist and I participated in digs in my youth. I watch and read everything I can find about it. I have no problem at all with 'remains' being used for objects or inanimate anything at all - villages, villas, Iron Age hill forts, temples, mosaic floors, causeways - as well as skeletal remains. There are other words that might be used for certain types of material or substances, words like remnants for fabrics or traces for foods but remains of chariots is fine. It includes quite damaged items or fragmentary items and well preserved items such as the chariots in pyramid tombs which might be intact.

    Hermione
     

    weristich

    Senior Member
    US and English
    The reason I can't give you any context is that it is in a footnote.
     
    Last edited:

    weristich

    Senior Member
    US and English
    Thanks Hermione. I thought I have heard of "remains" in the archeological sense. I watch a lot of crime dramas so the "remains" I know of are "human remains."
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    "Remains" is used in an archaeological sense all the time for inorganic things. There's really no end of examples:

    "The ideal feature for architectural study would be the remains of a house that was built with wall trenches, deep chimney base, and cellars . . . ." James Deetz, In Small Things Forgotten)

    "But it is otherwise with the graves where the remains of a boat, or of a ship, are found also." (Viking Society for Northern Research, Saga-book of the Viking Club vol. IV)

    "Beneath the temple was found a layer of careless construction, and, still lower, the remains of a palace like that at Tiryns." (American Journal of Archaeology vol. V)

    "On the left side were fragments of oxydated iron, apparently the remains of a shield, and also the oxydated remains of a spear . . . ." (Abstracts of the Proceedings of the Ashmolean Society vol. II)

    There are 243 Google Books results for "remains of a chariot," such as "In the graves had been found the remains of a chariot — an important element in British warfare." (The Antiquary vol. XXXII)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The reason I can't give you any context is that it is in a footnote.
    That is already more context than we had before.

    Telling us what it is a footnote to would be even more context.

    Context is there. (Context is always there, unless the poster invented a sample sentence to illustrate a question.) Please don't keep it a secret.
     
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