remangarse

William Stein

Senior Member
American English
This from a job announcement for an engineer:

Es muy conveniente que el candidato conozca la cultura de la empresa de tamaño medio preferiblemente familiar y que esté habituado a remangarse, a la austeridad y a gestionar con escasez de recursos.

For "remangarse" I found "to roll up one sleeves" in the Word Reference dictinonary and a completely different definition in the VOX Sp-En: "to make a snap decision, decide quickly". "To roll up one's sleeves" in English means to be willing to do the work yourself and get your hands dirty rather than delegating the job to somebody else. Can anybody tell which of those meanings (if either) is probably intended here?
 
  • William Stein

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm not sure because "que esté habituado a remangarse" is a habitual action ("was in the habit of getting ready for work" doesn't sound very convincing) and that doesn't have any logical connection with "a la austeridad y a gestionar con escasez de recursos (it doesn't necessarily have to, of course). Maybe "getting his hands dirty and working on a tight budget and with scarce resources"?
     

    jmc_ar

    Member
    Español (castellano), Argentina
    This from a job announcement for an engineer:

    Es muy conveniente que el candidato conozca la cultura de la empresa de tamaño medio preferiblemente familiar y que esté habituado a remangarse, a la austeridad y a gestionar con escasez de recursos.

    For "remangarse" I found "to roll up one sleeves" in the Word Reference dictinonary and a completely different definition in the VOX Sp-En: "to make a snap decision, decide quickly". "To roll up one's sleeves" in English means to be willing to do the work yourself and get your hands dirty rather than delegating the job to somebody else. Can anybody tell which of those meanings (if either) is probably intended here?
    "arremangarse" = "remangarse" means literally "to roll up one sleeves".
    Figuratively, at least in Argentina, this could refer to either:
    a) to be willing to do the work yourself
    and / or
    b) to be ready to get your hands dirty while your do something

    In this context I would understand a AND b.
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Yes, they want somebody with a "hands-on style." Reading between the lines: If you expect anything to get done, you better be ready to do it yourself.
     
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