Spanish to English renter

Dictionary entry: renter
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DearPrudence

Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
Dictionary Editor
IdF
French (lower Normandy)
I am not sure whether there is a problem with the translation or the enbase.

SpanishEnglish
alquilador, alquiladora nm, nf (quien da algo en alquiler)renter n
So in Spanish, this is the owner of the apartment.
But in enbase, the renter is only supposed to be the person who rents the apartment/pays the rent to live there.
Maybe there should be a new Sense for "renter" = "landlord"?
In any case, it seems ambiguous, so maybe a Dsense could be useful next to "renter" in esen?
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    Dictionary Editor
    American English
    Thanks, DearPrudence. I have fixed the es>en entry for alquilador, since that specific sense was referring to the owner and not to the person who's renting.

    I've also changed this report so that the English Base team can look at the entry for "renter" in the en>es dictionary, and possibly add a sense that includes "the person who rents their property". I saw that usage in our English monolingual entry for renter.
     

    Lexicografur

    WR Staff
    Dictionary Editor
    English - U.S.
    I do not agree that we should add a meaning to our English base for a person who rents their property (landlord, proprietor). I see that definition in the Collins dictionary licensed on our site, but I do not see it in other dictionaries I checked, and I am not familiar with that usage. Since our Spanish translation should include the ways that the language is most commonly used, I think it might also be better not to include that meaning there and you might want to review it again, @fenixpollo . I will tag this thread for UK review so our UK editor can change the English base if she thinks the proprietor sense is common there, but for now I think there is nothing to change in English base.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    Dictionary Editor
    American English
    You make a great point, Lexicografur. If you all wouldn't mind flipping this report back to Spanish->English when you finish reviewing the viability of adding that meaning, that will be my signal to review the English translation again.
     

    DrD

    Senior Member
    Dictionary Editor
    England English
    Well, the full OED says that use of renter is obsolete and rare, and Lexico doesn't mention it at all, so I'm going to say I don't think we should add it. Personally, I would always understand 'renter' to mean a person who pays rent, not a person receiving it. I've no idea why it appears so prominently in the Collins.
     

    Peterdg

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    For your information: Webster's New World Dictionary says for "renter"
    1) a person who pays rent for the use of property
    2) an owner who rents out property

    There is no mention "obsolete" or "rare".
     

    DrD

    Senior Member
    Dictionary Editor
    England English
    Hello,

    Thank you for the information. As a native UK English speaker, I would still say this is not a common usage of the word. And, as you can see above, Lexicografur, who is a native US English speaker is of the same opinion. Therefore, I'm going to stick by my decision that I don't think it's necessary to add that sense to WR's English base dictionary. Of course, if I get lots of messages from people telling me they actually do use the word that way or come across that usage commonly, I'll be quite prepared to revise my opinion.
     

    Peterdg

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I also checked my "van Dale Groot Woordenboek Engels Nederlands" (which is an English-Dutch dictionary) and they say about "renter": (ver)huurder, so meaning it can mean someone who pays rent or, when in combination with (ver), an owner who rents out property.

    The van Dale dictionaries are extremely reliable (which doesn't mean they never make mistakes :rolleyes: ).

    Anyway, I don't want to advocate to include this meaning in the WR dictionary, but perhaps it is used with this meaning in some very specific contexts or specific regions. Perhaps you could add a note to the dictionary that it is not common with this sense?????
     
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