replaced with or replaced by

Marketo

Member
Mexican-Spanish
is there any difference between saying " this person was replaced with other person" and " this person was replaced by other person".


Also I want to know if saying " to replace him by other person is correct" and why?
 
  • Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Your second example isn't correct.
    Regarding 'with' and 'by', in the sense that A replaces B, they mean the same thing but the more common version is with by, and not with. It is also possible to understand that the other person made the decision to replace the first, and we're not told who by.

    Adam was replaced with Bill.
    Adam was replaced by Bill (both have same meaning; Adam goes and Bill comes in).

    Adam was replaced by Bill (this can have the meaning that Bill decided that Adam had to be replaced, but the sentence doesn't say who Bill picked to replace Adam).
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you are referring to replacing something that is broken, old, or not working/inoperative, then you replace it with a new one.

    If you are referring to filling the role of someone or something with a substitute, then it is 'replaced by'.
    "Human bank tellers have all but been replaced by ATMs."
    Humans were not 'faulty', but ATMs were a cheaper substitute for one of the main duties of a teller; and more efficient, since they 'work' 24/7 and don't demand overtime!

    ATM: automatic teller machines - a 'flexiteller' in Australia.
     
    Last edited:

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would go one further. In addition to replacing the faulty impersonal thing you would replace by if you intend to upgrade. An example would be trading in your Chevrolet for a Cadillac. MilkyBar's ATM example is the perfect example as the substitute .
     

    Editor India

    Member
    Hindi
    "With" is used, when the subject of the sentence is the one that performs the action of replacement. For example: John (subject) replaced the old car with a new one. Here, the subject is "John"; hence, the preposition WITH is used between the two nouns (the new car and the old car) involved in the replacement.

    On the other hand, if the subject/the focus of the sentence is the one that was replaced, the preposition "by" should be used. For example: The old car was replaced by the new one. Note that such sentences/ phrases are always in passive voice.
     

    Alan Evangelista

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Considering all posts above, I see that the "replacing a broken part" meaning may conflict with the passive voice usage. How do I say "I replaced the broken lamp with a new one" in passive voice?

    The broken lamp was replaced with a new one.
    OR
    The broken lamp was replaced by a new one.
    ?

    I guess that the latter is the correct one.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Considering all posts above, I see that the "replacing a broken part" meaning may conflict with the passive voice usage. How do I say "I replaced the broken lamp with a new one" in passive voice?

    The broken lamp was replaced with a new one.
    OR
    The broken lamp was replaced by a new one.
    ?

    I guess that the latter is the correct one.
    I don't know why you want to use passive voice here, but "with" makes more sense to me in this sentence.

    I should also add that, depending on context, "Adam was replaced by Bill" could mean that Bill replaced Adam with someone or something else.
     

    Alan Evangelista

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I don't know why you want to use passive voice here, but "with" makes more sense to me in this sentence

    Thanks for the answer!

    I would want to use the passive voice for one of the same two reasons I use passive voice anywhere: to increase the focus on the object of the action (and thus reduce it on the subject). By the way, the second reason to use passive voice is to avoid expliciting the sentence subject, but it obvious does not apply to my examples.

    I understand the active voice is more used with "replace with" and passive voice is more used with "replace by", I just wanted to understand better the available options here.
     

    Ashraful Haque

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    I was answering an IELTS map question and I'm confused between 'replaced by' and 'replaced with.'
    "This playground will be replaced by/with a theater."

    I wrote 'replaced with' but the answer says 'replaced by.' Just so you know it's an American site magoosh.com
     

    Alex.R

    New Member
    English
    Considering all posts above, I see that the "replacing a broken part" meaning may conflict with the passive voice usage. How do I say "I replaced the broken lamp with a new one" in passive voice?

    The broken lamp was replaced with a new one.
    OR
    The broken lamp was replaced by a new one.
    ?

    I guess that the latter is the correct one.

    The broken lamp was replaced with a new one (by me)
     

    Gurjeetk

    New Member
    Hindi
    Hi to all,
    We use "by" With noun so ans will be a broken lamp was replaced with the new one by him.
    Means lamp was replaced with the new one bt who replaced it will be the person or noun who follows ''by''.

    Defective tab was replaced with a brand new laptop by our employer.

    I hope this helps!




    I
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's important to avoid confusing the reader. You're right, Gurjeetk, that when we use the passive we need the pattern:
    X was replaced with Y by Z.

    We replaced the workers with robots.
    The workers were replaced with robots.
    (We replaced them)
    The workers were replaced by robots. (As above, or perhaps the robots took over by themselves.)
    The workers were replaced with robots by the management. In the passive voice, use with if an agent is also mentioned (by the management).

    The playground will be replaced with/by a theatre. I think you can use either. Obviously a theatre cannot be responsible for replacing the playground, so the meaning is clear.

    The playground will be replaced with a theatre by the town council.
     
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