Replies to 'thank you' [you're welcome, etc.]

alc112

Senior Member
Argentina Spanish
Hi!!!
I want to know if there are other ways to answer when a person says to you "thank you".
I know these:
You're welcome
It's ok
Not at all

And I also want to know how common are they used in (or "at":confused: ) speaking and if you can put it in orden (from informal to formal)
Thank you
(your answer):D
 
  • jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Not at all - formal (at least in my part of the world)
    you're welcome - most common
    it's ok- informal
    sure- informal
    sure thing
    What are friends for? (if your friend is thanking you!)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Also,

    -Anytime.
    -Yup.
    -No problem.
    -No prob.
    -Mm-hm. (Believe it or not!)

    All but the first one are informal. The first one is semi-formal, I guess, but can definitely be used in informal situations as well.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    alc112 said:
    And I also want to know how common are they used in (or "at":confused: ) speech and if you can put it in order (from informal to formal)
    Thank you
    (your answer):D
    In response to your in/at question.

    I would definitely say "in" - "at" doesn't work here.

    And "in speech" just sounds a little better than "in speaking."
     

    whatonearth

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    You could use - 'No worries' - fairly informal, friendly

    elroy - Not sure about "Mm-hm" and "Yup", sorry! They just seem a little rude and presumptious to me :eek:

    Don't mean to be rude!
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    whatonearth said:
    You could use - 'No worries' - fairly informal, friendly

    elroy - Not sure about "Mm-hm" and "Yup", sorry! They just seem a little rude and presumptious to me :eek:

    Don't mean to be rude!
    Haha, not at all. I don't think they're rude or presumptuous; I just think they're very very informal. I wouldn't say them unless I knew the person very very well. I have heard them, though, and certainly not in rude contexts. Perhaps it's a British/American difference.

    By the way, "no worries" reminds me of a British response I learned when I was in England: "no dramas!" (which I find very endearing! :) )
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    I agree with all! :thumbsup:

    You're welcome
    My pleasure
    It's no big deal
    Anytime
    Sure
    I'm happy to help
    Forget about it
    No biggie
    Sure thing
    Think nothing of it
    I'm sure you'd do the same for me
    Thanks bunches
    Thanky-thanky (This isn't common, but my friends and I say it)

    panjandrum said:
    Look them in the eye and smile, genuinely.
    The words you use, or do not use, are almost irrelevant.
    The body language is critical.
    I agree with most of what you said, Pan. Body language is the most expressive.
    But, if I said, "Thank you", and the other person just smiled, I'd think, "How rude!" But, that's just me. :rolleyes:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    VenusEnvy said:
    I agree with most of what you said, Pan. Body language is the most expressive.
    But, if I said, "Thank you", and the other person just smiled, I'd think, "How rude!" But, that's just me. :rolleyes:
    But Venus, you have never seen me smile:)
    I did say "almost irrelevant". Words help, but can be worthless if said as a matter of form, without sincerity.
    I guess I am thinking back to my very recent week in Italy when I had to rely so much on expression and gesture rather than my very basic grasp of Italian.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    VenusEnvy said:
    I agree with all! :thumbsup:

    You're welcome
    My pleasure
    It's no big deal
    Anytime
    Sure
    I'm happy to help
    Forget about it
    No biggie
    Sure thing
    Think nothing of it
    I'm sure you'd do the same for me
    Thanks bunches
    Thanky-thanky (This isn't common, but my friends and I say it)


    I agree with most of what you said, Pan. Body language is the most expressive.
    But, if I said, "Thank you", and the other person just smiled, I'd think, "How rude!" But, that's just me. :rolleyes:
    Haha, in Dutch a lot of people just say "ja" (i.e., yes), which weirded me out in the beginning. Strangely enough, I don't find "yup" rude in English...I guess it depends on familiarity with the language! :)
     

    Eddie

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Many young African American males in my area give either of the following two replies:

    -Ain't nothin'.
    -Ain't no thang. (pronounced the way it's written - the influence of Southern black pronunciation)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Eddie said:
    -Ain't no thang. (pronounced the way it's written - the influence of Southern Black pronunciation)
    Along this line, I hear often, "Ain't no thang but a chicken wang." (Once again, pronounced the way it is written.)
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Don't forget

    de nada

    which is one of expressions that have crept into English from the many Spanish speakers in the USA. --that thread is surely here somewhere. :)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Edwin said:
    Don't forget

    de nada

    which is one of expressions that have crept into English from the many Spanish speakers in the USA. --that thread is surely here somewhere. :)
    Edwin: That's right! But, when the gringos say it, it sounds something like "day nad-dah". :p
     

    JohninVirginia

    Senior Member
    USA/ English
    alc112 said:
    Hi!!!
    I want to know if there are other ways to answer when a person says to you "thank you".
    I know these:
    You're welcome
    It's ok
    Not at all

    And I also want to know how common are they used in (or "at":confused: ) speaking and if you can put it in orden (from informal to formal)
    Thank you
    (your answer):D
    "How commonly are they used in speaking" or
    "How commonly are they used in speech" or
    How common are they in speaking" or
    "How common are they in (normal) speech" or
    "How common is their use in speech" etc.
     

    Mr X

    Member
    Australia, English
    Again, sorry I'm a bit late, but here's my answer:

    I would use 'no worries' the most, otherwise perhaps I'd say 'that's ok' or 'you're right.'

    Mr X.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Mr X said:
    Again, sorry I'm a bit late, but here's my answer:

    I would use 'no worries' the most, otherwise perhaps I'd say 'that's ok' or 'you're right.'

    Mr X.
    "You're right"???? :confused: :eek:

    Doesn't that sound kind of presumptuous?
     

    Mr X

    Member
    Australia, English
    elroy said:
    "You're right"???? :confused: :eek:

    Doesn't that sound kind of presumptuous?
    No, no, it doesn't mean 'you're right to thank me' or anything like that! It's more short for 'you're alright', or 'that's alright' or something. I'm finding it hard to explain. :)

    I use it a lot for when someone apologises. So they say 'sorry', then I'll say 'you're right', meaning 'don't worry about it', 'that's alright', something like that...

    It sounds really crazy when I try to explain it, doesn't it?

    Mr X.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Mr X said:
    .......I use it a lot for when someone apologises. So they say 'sorry', then I'll say 'you're right', meaning 'don't worry about it', 'that's alright', something like that...
    It sounds really crazy when I try to explain it, doesn't it?
    It makes perfect sense to anyone who's ever watched Neighbours (and survived):)
     

    cherry3024

    Member
    Chinese
    Dear friends,

    Could you tell me please in oral English if I can use 'cheers' or 'no worries' to respond to 'thank you'? If not, what do you normally use in less formal situation rather than 'you are welcome'? That's nothing? No problem? Or with my pleasure?

    Thank you very much!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    <Mod note: Cherry's thread has been merged with an earlier thread>

    You can certainly says 'cheers' or 'no worries' to me, but I think these might be more unusual to AmE speakers. It would depend on which variety of English the other person uses.
     

    cherry3024

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much for your swift reply. I think it's rather British response too:)
    <Mod note: Cherry's thread has been merged with an earlier thread>

    You can certainly says 'cheers' or 'no worries' to me, but I think these might be more unusual to AmE speakers. It would depend on which variety of English the other person uses.
     
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