report vs register [to college]

jackie2jet

Senior Member
chinese
if you go to the college for the first time,you would say register to that school.
Can i say report to the college?
what are their differences?
Thank you very much!
 
Last edited:
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    If you report to the college, you arrive to a college where you are expected to be. You might say when you are talking about when you have to arrive at the college.

    When you register at the college, you fill out the papers that they require for you to be a student.
     

    jackie2jet

    Senior Member
    chinese
    If you report to the college, you arrive to a college where you are expected to be. You might say when you are talking about when you have to arrive at the college.

    When you register at the college, you fill out the papers that they require for you to be a student.
    thanks for your reply,I still don't get it,it seems they are the same thing whether i want to be in this school or not. could you explain it in more details?
    Thanks in advance
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    If you "report to the college" you turn up at the reception and say "I'm JackieJet and I have a meeting with XXX at 3p.m." i.e. report/announce your presence.

    To register means "sign up with" by filling out forms, etc. as Cagey said.
     

    jackie2jet

    Senior Member
    chinese
    If you "report to the college" you turn up at the reception and say "I'm JackieJet and I have a meeting with XXX at 3p.m." i.e. report/announce your presence.

    To register means "sign up with" by filling out forms, etc. as Cagey said.
    thanks!
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Report is the kind of word used for the military. You report to a place they tell you to be. I personally would not use it in relation to college.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Report is the kind of word used for the military. You report to a place they tell you to be. I personally would not use it in relation to college.
    Same here.

    Here you register for college months in advance and usually online, or you won't find a seat in the classes you want! And you do this every term. Before you can register of course you need to be admitted which means applying with all your transcripts!

    On the first day of school, you attend your first class. You don't report in any other way.

    So someone could say: I registered for college back in July. Now it's the end of August and I'm excited about attending my first class next week.

    I would only use "report to" for the kinds of jobs where you need to check in with a boss or dispatcher on site, especially military or quasi military organizations like the police. I've never had a job that would require that, I just would turn up at work unless I called in sick!

    The only thing "report to the college" suggests to me is someone wrote a report on a topic on request of the college. Even so usually you would report to a specific department of the university: "She submitted a report to the Department Head about the challenges facing international students in their first year on campus."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't know what happens these days because I went to college in the pre-internet era. But we were told what day we should arrive (not report) and we were welcomed, moved into our dorm rooms, had an orientation week and registered for our specific first quarter classes during that week. We started classes the following week.

    We had all applied and been offered a place months earlier by filling out an application and receiving a letter of acceptance. We then had to make a final decision about where to attend, if we received more than one acceptance. It was that commitment to one of our choices that allowed us to arrive and move in on the appointed date.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Ah I'm thinking about nonresidential colleges! Yes moving into dorms complicates it! There is probably a word for residential colleges move in day. It wouldn't be report to, though
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I don't know what happens these days because I went to college in the pre-internet era. But we were told what day we should arrive (not report) and we were welcomed, moved into our dorm rooms, had an orientation week and registered for our specific first quarter classes during that week. We started classes the following week.

    We had all applied and been offered a place months earlier by filling out an application and receiving a letter of acceptance. We then had to make a final decision about where to attend, if we received more than one acceptance. It was that commitment to one of our choices that allowed us to arrive and move in on the appointed date.
    This is what happens now in the Internet era also. The difference between the internet era and earlier is in the registration for classes. It theoretically would be possible for new students to register for classes before they arrive on campus, but there are two problems with that: 1) they register for classes without meeting with advisors, so a lot of mistakes have to be set right once students arrive on campus, and 2) registration for classes means one is reserving seats in classes. This leads to all sorts of complications if the student ends up not being fully authorized by the Federal government to enter the US. I suppose there are colleges where entering students register for classes before they arrive on campus, but in my opinion, that is a mistake for everyone involved.

    The original question asked "If you go to the college for the first time,you would say register to that school."
    Students in general say I go to/I attend/I'm a student at X University/College.
    If you are not yet taking classes, but you've been accepted (for instance, if it's now June and classes start in September), you could say
    I'm going to X University in the fall.
    or, if you want to be more formal,
    I have accepted X University's offer of admission, and I will be attending classes there in the fall. or
    I have accepted X University's offer of admission, and I will register there beginning in the fall.
    Normally first-year students have a few days of meetings, activities, advising sessions, etc. before classes start. If you want to be more specific about what you will be doing at the beginning of your first semester:
    -- I have to be on campus on September 1 for orientation
    -- Orientation starts on September 1, and we register for classes on the 3rd.
    -- I move into my dorm on September 1st and classes start on the 6th.
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Where I live most colleges are commuter colleges with only small dorms. So there is no campus wide orientation or advising. When I download my class list at the start of term I can see when students registered which often is in July. There is a certain amount of churn in the first week as students get into waitlisted courses and drop existing courses. Students have access to advisors but first year is pretty basic. Since most students live near campus they could get advising over spring or summer.

    So definitely all my students have registered by the first day of class, even if they are on the waitlist or registered for another class but shifted to mine.

    I don't know how it works for international students who arrive shortly before classes start. I expect they need to be accepted registered and paid in full before they leave their home country.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Where I live most colleges are commuter colleges with only small dorms. So there is no campus wide orientation or advising. When I download my class list at the start of term I can see when students registered which often is in July. There is a certain amount of churn in the first week as students get into waitlisted courses and drop existing courses. Students have access to advisors but first year is pretty basic. Since most students live near campus they could get advising over spring or summer.

    So definitely all my students have registered by the first day of class, even if they are on the waitlist or registered for another class but shifted to mine.

    I don't know how it works for international students who arrive shortly before classes start. I expect they need to be accepted registered and paid in full before they leave their home country.
    You're right, a commuter school is much different from a (primarily) residential school.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    'Sign up for' is a fairly close synonym for one of the meanings of 'register.'
    'Students register for classes' and 'students sign up for classes' mean the same thing.
    'Registering' and 'signing up for' usually connote a voluntary action.
    But 'report to' is different. When soldiers report to (or report for) duty, they are obeying an order. When students arrive on a college campus, they aren't doing so because they have been given an order in the way that lower-ranking soldiers are given orders by their commanding officer.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The following uses AE terminology and describes the U.S. system.

    1. You apply to a college
    2. They either accept you and offer you a place or they turn you down
    3. If they accept you you still have to decide whether you want to go there. You might have been accepted to more than one college.
    4. You pick the one you want to go to and inform them you have decided to attend there. They send you the information about what to do next and when to come, which is usually many months later. (You could possibly say you are now enrolled at that college. Maybe.)
    5. You show up on the correct day and register/sign up for your classes. There are potentially dozens of freshman-level classes. Not only are there different subjects but there are different sessions for the same subject and you have to pick a specific one at a specific time that fits in with your other classes. Now you are enrolled and registered for classes and you are a few days away from attending your first class.
    6. You go to the lecture halls or classrooms corresponding to the correct days and times listed on your schedule to attend your classes.

    ["Report" is not used anywhere above.]
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top