require/request

black_widow

New Member
Spanish - ARGENTINA
Hi there!
I am quite confused with these two verbs. Every time I have to translate (requerir) or use one of these, I don't know which to use. As I am currently working in a Lawyer Bufette, most of the time I come across with the difficulty when dealing with legal vocabulary.

Is there a significant difference? What's the collocation/usage? I see that "request" is normally more frequently used, but sometimes, it just doesn't sound good to me.

The structure would be to request / require something to somebody?

Any help is more than welcome.
 
  • 1. Please do not use Spanish in the English Only section
    2. I do not quite understand your sentence, maybe I need to read it twice but the basic difference is that "to request" means "to ask", "to apply for", while "to require" means "to demand", "to need".
    I think looking through dictionary definitions might help better understanding.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This is an oversimplification.

    Request = ask for
    Require = need

    I require (need) another cup of coffee.
    I will request (ask for) one when my butler answers the bell.

    I have to simplify because the further I think into these two words the more it seems they come closer together.

    (I don't think a passing mention of one word of Spanish is a hanging offence :))
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    This is an oversimplification.

    Request = ask for
    Require = need

    I require (need) another cup of coffee.
    I will request (ask for) one when my butler answers the bell.

    I have to simplify because the further I think into these two words the more it seems they come closer together.

    (I don't think a passing mention of one word of Spanish is a hanging offence :))
    There is a difference, surely, when "require" is used transitively:
    "I require some stationery" - as you say, this means you need it and are asking for it.
    But: "You are required to visit your local police station to produce your driving license". This is a forceful demand.
    Incidentally, 19th century naval orders to captains started with the words "You are requested and required...". I think that here the two words were synonymous, being doubled up for effect, as in "hale and hearty", "to have and to hold", "fine and dandy".
     

    black_widow

    New Member
    Spanish - ARGENTINA
    1. Please do not use Spanish in the English Only section
    2. I do not quite understand your sentence, maybe I need to read it twice but the basic difference is that "to request" means "to ask", "to apply for", while "to require" means "to demand", "to need".
    I think looking through dictionary definitions might help better understanding.
    Thank you for your reply. Now, which sentence exactly you did not understand? :confused:

    I am aware of the existence of dictionaries (thanks for your suggestion), and I always look for definitions, and I rely on them. But I also like communicating with people, and I am always willing to learn from others, that is why I dare to ask a question in this forum, which I regularly read with great interest. I communicate, therefore, I learn. ;)
     
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