reside temporally [paraphrase for 'stay'?]

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi teachers,
Would, 'reside temporally; spend time temporally' be appropriate paraphrases for 'stay' in the following sentence?
He will have to stay a few days in the hospital.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The adverb is temporarily.
    You don't reside in a hospital if you are a patient. You spend some time or stay there.

    The idea of a temporary stay is already expressed in the phrase spend some time.
    I find a sentence like I was unable to feed my dog due to a temporary stay in hospital somewhat absurd.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi e2efour,
    Thanks for your reply. I have no intention of substituting the paraphrase for the original one. It's just to explain the meaning to the students and not using a false friend.
    Then the paraphrase for my original sentence would be, 'spend some time'.

    TL
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Just a note, Tenacious Learner, that "in hospital" is BrE. In AmE, we say "in the hospital" even if we're not referring to a particular hospital. I cannot explain this difference; it just is that way. (Logically, we should all be saying "in a hospital", but . . . ).
     

    gramman

    Senior Member
    On another technical note:

    >>You don't reside in a hospital if you are a patient.

    Some patients do reside in hospitals. In the context I'm familiar with, anyone that's in (a) hospital for thirty days or more (sounds like fun, eh?) is classified as residing there. Information about this is probably available from the U.S. Census Bureau, however:
    Due to the lapse in government funding, census.gov sites, services, and all online survey collection requests will be unavailable until further notice.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi teachers,
    My original sentence:
    He will have to stay a few days in the hospital.
    Since the best paraphrase for 'stay' is 'spend some time' and the original sentence already has 'a few'; would it be correct to say that 'pass a few days' is a paraphrase for 'stay a few days', in this case?

    TL
     

    kyrintethron

    Senior Member
    English - America
    "Pass a few days" relates to leisure and gives a sense of relaxation. If you're in the hospital, you're more likely to be "staying a few days" or "spending a few days" rather than simply "passing a few days" there.

    However, you could "pass a few days" or "stay a few days" or "spend a few days" at a campsite while on a road trip, or "pass/spend/stay a few hours" in an airport lounge while waiting for your flight.

    -K
     
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