reside vs locate

skydown13

Senior Member
Mandarin
My company resides in California, USA.

My company locates in California, USA.

Which one is better?
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello,

    I couldn't use either, I'm afraid. "Resides" makes me think of a person, and intransitive use of "locates" sounds odd to me in this context. Our dictionary gives an example of intransitive use: "They decided to locate in New Mexico" - but that's about an act, whereas your sentence is about a state.
     
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    cossack5

    Senior Member
    Russian
    <<An Oxford dictionary>> has this:
    ■ [no obj. N. Amer, with adverbial of place] establish oneself or one's business in a specified place his marketing strategy has been to locate in small towns
    skydown13, If you want a standart-english variant, reside is way better.

    [Note: Sorry to barge into your post, Cossack5, but the colored fonts you had used could be difficult to read on some screens, so I changed them to ordinary bold-face black. :) -- JustKate, English Only moderator]
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    <<An Oxford dictionary>> has this:

    skydown13, If you want a standart-english variant, reside is way better.
    Pardon? You are contradicting the opinions of three native speakers and I wonder why? Reside is most often used for people and is not a good standard option for a business location.
    I can assure you that a business can be located in a town!
     
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    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I agree with Suzi - resides is...well, it's not impossible to say this about a business, but it's pretty odd. Is located is much better. Another alternative that I don't think has been mentioned so far is headquartered: "My company is headquartered in California."
     

    cossack5

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Pardon? You are contradicting the opinions of three native speakers and I wonder why? Reside is most often used for people and is not a good standard option for a business location.
    I can assure you that a business can be located in a town!
    If you can see from my post (I've cited the last meaning where '[no obj]' means the verb doesn't take (is allowed not to take) an object, though it's a clear Americanism), so I don't have anything against 'locate a business somewhere', I just oppose 'bussiness locates / have located somewhere'.
    I hope I'm understood.:)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Dear Cossack5,
    No, I don't really understand your point, but that doesn't really matter. In general I would say that finding a definition that says one meaning or usage does not, actually, rule out other meanings or uses.

    However, that is not very relevant. The point that I was disagreeing with was you assertion that is it standard to use resides. Which is an error on your part.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I've got a bit lost in this thread:(

    I'm sorry if I'm repeating what people have said before, but I wouldn't use either of skydown's original options:
    My company resides in California, USA.:cross:
    My company locates in California, USA.:cross:

    I would use:
    My company is located in California.
    or:
    My company is based in California.

    Apologies if this is superfluous:eek:.
     

    skydown13

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Sorry to cause such a fierce discussion. My company is located/based in California, USA is exactly what I meant.
     
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