reside with/in

dn88

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

I've got a question concerning the sentence below:

Constitutional monarchy is a form of government in which a king or queen acts as Head of State, while the ability to make and pass legislation resides with an elected Parliament.
And I'm quite doubtful about the part "resides with". Shouldn't it be "resides in" instead?

The source is HERE.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • konungursvia

    Banned
    Canada (English)
    It looks just fine to me. I wouldn't change it. To reside in means more literally to live in, such as living in a house, a cave, a hole in the ground, etc.
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello konungursvia and thank you,

    Actually I mean "reside in" used figuratively. To me, a non-native speaker of English, this "with" construction seems quite strange. If I got the point, "reside with" in the context means literally "live with". But I think if I replaced it with "reside in", it would imply that "elected Parliament has the power to make and pass legislation" (hence this power resides in an elected Parliament). Is it really wrong to use "reside in"?
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello konungursvia and thank you,

    Actually I mean "reside in" used figuratively. To me, a non-native speaker of English, this "with" construction seems quite strange. If I got the point, "reside with" in the context means literally "live with". But I think if I replaced it with "reside in", it would imply that "elected Parliament has the power to make and pass legislation" (hence this power resides in an elected Parliament). Is it really wrong to use "reside in"?
    Power is something one has, therefore, it is something one is empowered with. Power is not something that I have in me - it is something that I have been endowed with/given/taken, etc. In your example, power has been given to Parliament by the people. It is an ability to do something, control something, etc. It is the possession of control and, as a result, the power of whatever lies with Parliament, not in Parliament.
     
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