Residential community/area

ilearner

New Member
Chinese - China
In Chinese, garden has two meanings, one is the same as English, the other is a residential community, but I don't think the English speakers can understand it when you translate such residential community into English as XXX garden, particularly in the bus stop announcement, but it is a little bit too long when it says XXX residential community/area, are there shorter or more concise terms that can replace residential community in the bus announcement? I remember the primary school English textbook in China used "estate", I am not sure whether it is good, please advice, thanks.
 
  • ilearner

    New Member
    Chinese - China
    Hi, Sdgraham, thanks for quick reply, I mean the bus stop announcement is using "XXX garden" to refer a stop of XXX residential community, I don't think it is correct, could you please advice what shorter or more concise term can be used to refer a residential community?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Here in the U.S., (at least where I have lived) we do not append anything like "garden" or "residential community" to bus (or light rail or streetcar) stops -- even when there is such a thing, which is not typical.
     

    ilearner

    New Member
    Chinese - China
    Hi, Sdgraham, but in China, many schools, hospitals, shopping malls, residential communities are used as bus stop names, now please ignore the bus announcement, could you please tell me what other alternative terms for residential community/area, since calling a residential community as XXX garden is incorrect, in addition to XXX residential community, can I say it XXX estate or other terms.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Here in the UK, this type of residential development is usually given an individual name. Although the term "estate" is used in BE, it generally refers to large developments possibly with several hundred houses: the type of development you're referring to here might be called something like, say, "Victoria Gardens" or perhaps "Oakwood", and that would be the name of the nearest bus or tram stop. Often, they're named after whatever was there before the development was built: "Bannerbrook Farm" is one local one that springs to mind.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Here in the UK, this type of residential development is usually given an individual name. Although the term "estate" is used in BE, it generally refers to large developments possibly with several hundred houses: the type of development you're referring to here might be called something like, say, "Victoria Gardens" or perhaps "Oakwood", and that would be the name of the nearest bus or tram stop.
    Same here.
    When we have such a thing, we use whatever name it was given.
    In suburban Portland, Oregon there's a place called "King City," and that's all, since everybody around here knows what it is.
    The community was built by the Tualatin Development Company starting in 1964.[6] Created as a planned community for adults, King City was incorporated in March 1966. Build-out of the original 273 acres (110 ha) finished about 1978.[6] Originally, King City was developed as an age-restricted community governed by the rules of the King City Civic Association (KCCA) in which people under 50 could not live in the city.
    I think you're trying to force something from your own culture into one where it doesn't exist.
     

    ilearner

    New Member
    Chinese - China
    Hi, DonnyB, You mentioned "Victoria Gardens", seems using garden to refer a residential community is appropriate, do I misunderstand what you said? There is a big cultural difference related to living environment between China and western countries, in many western countries, people live in independent house usually having two or three floors even in the suburban of big cities, in contrast, China is a densely populated country, only the richest people or top officials can live in independent house, most people live in separate residential communities (most are gated or walled style since 2000 developed by different real estate developers), the real estate developers usually hammer out a beautiful name for a newly built residential community for the purpose of good luck and attracting buyers, "Garden" is one of the most frequently used term, e.g. XXX Garden, but I still highly doubt that whether a visitor from English speaking country will asscotiate it with a residential community when he hears XXX Garden from the bus stop announcement.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Usually, the name given to a residential development in the UK is chosen by the developer with the aim of attracting buyers. So "xxx Gardens" is quite a common one and could well refer to sheltered accommodation or some sort of 'gated' development. If on the other hand it's a block of flats, then "Victoria House" would probably be used instead.

    I think the assumption is that most people going there on the bus would know what it was and roughly where they were going, so the bus stop would be labelled "Victoria Gardens" or "Victoria House" just so that they would know where to get off. :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Usually, the name given to a residential development in the UK is chosen by the developer with the aim of attracting buyers. So "xxx Gardens" is quite a common one and could well refer to sheltered accommodation or some sort of 'gated' development. If on the other hand it's a block of flats, then "Victoria House" would probably be used instead.

    I think the assumption is that most people going there on the bus would know what it was and roughly where they were going, so the bus stop would be labelled "Victoria Gardens" or "Victoria House" just so that they would know where to get off. :)
    Just to be sure: I believe that Victoria Gardens is named for actual horticultural environment, i.e. flowers, grass, trees, etc. and does not automatically mean a living community as the OP suggests.

    Right?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Just to be sure: I believe that Victoria Gardens is named for actual horticultural environment, i.e. flowers, grass, trees, etc. and does not automatically mean a living community as the OP suggests.

    Right?
    In fact, no - not necessarily. ;)

    It could mean a public open space such as you describe, or it could be the name of a residential development, almost a 'mini-estate' as in the OP's scenario. There's even one near me which is in fact a residential home for the elderly.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi, Sdgraham, but in China, many schools, hospitals, shopping malls, residential communities are used as bus stop names, now please ignore the bus announcement, could you please tell me what other alternative terms for residential community/area, since calling a residential community as XXX garden is incorrect, in addition to XXX residential community, can I say it XXX estate or other terms.
    As a general rule, in English you do not add a word to the name of a residential community beyond its own name to indicate that it is a residential community. For example, in London you would simply speak of "Chelsea" or "Mayfair" or "Lambeth"; in New York you would simply say "Inwood" or "Sunnyside" or "Maspeth" or "Bensonhurst", and everyone would recognize that as the name of the community. If you really wanted to specify that a named community was a smaller part of a larger municipality, in American English you might say "neighborhood" or "area", as in "the Bensonhurst neighborhood of Brooklyn", or "the Germantown area of Philadelphia", etc.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I still highly doubt that whether a visitor from English speaking country will asscotiate it with a residential community when he hears XXX Garden from the bus stop announcement.
    You can doubt it all you want .... but that's the way it works here.
    Virtually everybody knows the name (and nature) of their destination when they start out for it. :rolleyes:
     
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