response to intermeddling

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  • GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Ofriendragon,
    There are probably tens or hundreds of ways of expressing anger, ranging from the subtly ironic to the offensive or obscene. It would help to give a more concrete example of what you would like to say, so that others can judge the appropriate "response level".
    Cheers,
    GEMatt
     

    mirx

    Banned
    Español
    he wants a synonym of "is non of your business".

    a very agressive one.

    "What do you care?"

    another still offensive.

    "I don't think it has anything to do with you".
     

    MrJamSandwich

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Of course you could get a lot blunter and a lot ruder eg. "get lost!" or "(insert almost any expletive here) off!" but these phrases are not specific to the given situation, whereas mirx's are.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    How do you express your angry anger at the person when he a person who intermeddles in (or with) your business, but it obviously has nothing to do with him?




    A small aside - intermeddle is a good, sound old-fashioned word. It includes such a strong sense of interfering in something that doesn't concern him that I don't think you need to add the ", but it obviously ...." part of the sentence.

    It is, however, a very unusual word.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    hi, guys
    How do you express your angry at the person when he intermeddles your business, but it obviously has nothing to do with him?

    (I mean besides None of your business)

    thanks.
    Here are a few variations:

    "Keep your nose out of my business."
    "Who asked you?"
    "Mind your own business."
    "What's it got to do with you?"
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hi Ofriendragon,

    Another expression of anger, fairly common, is:

    If I want your opinion, I'll ask for it!

    That's usually said very strongly, and implies that you want the person to "Butt out!" or even "Go F____ yourself, you meddler!"
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    A small aside - intermeddle is a good, sound old-fashioned word. It includes such a strong sense of interfering in something that doesn't concern him that I don't think you need to add the ", but it obviously ...." part of the sentence.

    It is, however, a very unusual word.
    Yes, very unusual. If meddling is interfering in affairs between two or more other people, and the prefix inter means between, then the word intermeddle seems rather redundant. I suppose the redundancy does add a little emphasis.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Intermeddle came to English originally meaning to mix together, intermingle, intermix; then to mix onself up with something; and finally to interfere in someone else's business.

    I thought at first it was a conflation of interfere and meddle, but it has its very own pedigree:)
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    Intermeddle came to English originally meaning to mix together, intermingle, intermix; then to mix onself up with something; and finally to interfere in someone else's business.

    I thought at first it was a conflation of interfere and meddle, but it has its very own pedigree:)
    Now that's enlightening. It true...you learn something every day--especially hanging around these forums.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    I liked the put-down I overheard once when someone asked one question too many —> "If I told you that, you'd know as much as I do about this, and we wouldn't want that, would we?"
     
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