retarded / retard

LuiC'estMoi

Senior Member
English - UK
Hi, how would one translate 'retarded' into French? Literally it means 'attardé mental' but in English (in England, anyway), you often hear it between young people to mean that the other person is a bit 'maladroit', 'emprunté'. For example if my friend tried to throw something in the bin but missed completely, I could say, 'oh, you're so retarded', in a friendly way.

Is there a word in French that is stronger than 'maladroit' but not really offensive? I've heard people use 'triso(mique)' but that seems rather strong to me?

Thank you!
 
  • orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Nothing leaps to mind in answer to the question, but I just thought I'd say, as a 39-year-old, calling someone a retard, or retarded does sound pretty offensive to me, but I guess it's come (back) over from American teens (and it would also depend on the tone of voice as well, I guess; I mean if it was said jokily or not)
     

    Systema

    Member
    French - France
    We don't really use "triso".
    I am thinking of "espèce de blaireau" or "gros naze" but I am afraid that it would not sound that friendly...
     

    NemoNobody

    Senior Member
    French - France
    IMHO, the closer adjective is "empoté" (see http://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/empot%C3%A9), but it misses the mental idea.

    "Trisomique" isn't that bad among close friends...

    Otherwise, there are plenty circumlocutions in French to say that, mainly around birth:

    - tu as eu un problème d'oxygénation à la naissance ;
    - tu as été bercé trop près du mur ;
    - c'est ton atavisme qui veut ça ;
    - etc.
     

    LuiC'estMoi

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Nothing leaps to mind in answer to the question, but I just thought I'd say, as a 39-year-old, calling someone a retard, or retarded does sound pretty offensive to me, but I guess it's come (back) over from American teens (and it would also depend on the tone of voice as well, I guess; I mean if it was said jokily or not)
    Hi Orlando, I do agree that it is offensive, and I would most definitely not use that word in reference to or in the presence of someone who was actually disabled or had a mental incapacity, but as someone surrounded by young people ever day at university I can assure you that it is a commonly used word, not to offend someone per se but as a "friendly" insult, despite it's clearly offensive connotations.

    Systema - I think something like gros naze would fit perfectly, when I say it is friendly I just mean that the other person wouldn't take offense. If I said 'gros naze!' to a friend with a smile, I would assume he wouldn't actually be upset! Regarding 'triso', I've definitely heard young people say it, especially my younger cousin, although admittedly not as much as something like 'naze'. Maybe 'abruti' is a comparable word, again depending on the way you say it?
     
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    orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Possibly (mais quel abruti!) - or qu'est-ce que t'es con, toi or something maybe, said in a suitably jokey way to show you don't really mean it [ps. not arguing with you that retarded isn't used that way by Brits in their teens/early 20s, but it's still quite crude and non PC language; just saying it's not appropriate in many contexts, in case French people reading the thread think it's always taken as harmless and friendly]
     

    romainHMM

    Member
    Français, France
    Je crois que tu peux dire "non mais t'es triso ou quoi?" à quelqu'un dans ce cas là, c'est assez courant chez les adolescents (j'en était un il n'y a pas si longtemps). "attardé" marche aussi. Si le ton est à la plaisanterie personne ne s’offensera
     

    alexg35

    New Member
    Francais
    I think the most apropriate traduction would be 'gogole': the first meaning would be the same than 'retarded' and it's also used among young people.
    Most of time you say 'sale gogole': if you say that to a friend, he won't feel offended.
     

    Seeda

    Banned
    法语 / French (FR)
    Triso is indeed very common. Gogole has gotten a little old-fashioned these days, or is it just in my area? Mongol is still usual, though. When I was a very young teen going to this ghetto middle school, a popular slang term was trimard, probably for its relatively aggressive sonority (stress both R's). I wonder if youngsters still say that. Also: bouffon, manchot (of sb very clumsy).
     

    romainHMM

    Member
    Français, France
    Triso is indeed very common. Gogole has gotten a little old-fashioned these days, or is it just in my area? Mongol is still usual, though. When I was a very young teen going to this ghetto middle school, a popular slang term was trimard, probably for its relatively aggressive sonority (stress both R's). I wonder if youngsters still say that. Also: bouffon, manchot (of sb very clumsy).
    Je suis d'accord, gogole me parait "old-fashioned". Mais j'ai jamais entendu "trimard" par contre
     

    Seeda

    Banned
    法语 / French (FR)
    Je viens seulement de découvrir en vérifiant que le mot "trimard" signifie originellement "chemineau" et par extension "vagabond". Ca me fait penser qu'on disait aussi "clochard" pour quelqu'un qui avait deux mains gauches, sans aucun sous-entendu par rapport à sa classe sociale. C'est sûrement l'idée de "galérer" à faire les choses.
    Il faut dire qu'on a un argot assez particulier en Moselle. La garro, nous on connaît pas; on fume des "schmers" ;)
     

    LuiC'estMoi

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Possibly (mais quel abruti!) - or qu'est-ce que t'es con, toi or something maybe, said in a suitably jokey way to show you don't really mean it [ps. not arguing with you that retarded isn't used that way by Brits in their teens/early 20s, but it's still quite crude and non PC language; just saying it's not appropriate in many contexts, in case French people reading the thread think it's always taken as harmless and friendly]
    Fair enough, completely agree with you. Thanks everyone for your suggestions :)
     
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