revoke

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jasonforce

New Member
Cantonese
May I use the word "revoke"?

The situation is when a record in a computer system has A to G procedures, but I found there is something should redo at C, so I tell someone "Please revoke the record to B.". Am I correct? As someone tell me revoke should be cancel the whole record ...
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Jason Force, welcome to the forum. :)

    I'd be confused if you told me to "revoke" that record to B. If I were you, I'd try another verb: Erase/remove steps C through G and start at B again.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Sure, Jason. In my experience, "revoke" is almost always used with rights and privileges. For instance, authorities can "revoke" somebody's driver's license if he violates too many traffic laws. Using "revoke" to mean "undo" or "erase" in a technical context sounds odd to me. Others may have a different opinion on the topic.
     
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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Roll back" is a common expression in such situations, but certainly not "revoke," as Owlman and Copyright have mentioned above.
     

    jasonforce

    New Member
    Cantonese
    Thank you Copyright, owlman and adgraham!

    Initially, I've chosen "roll back", but I found that "roll back"/"rollback" can not be used as a verb in google dictionary...instead I remember the word "revoke".

    Refer to owlman reply, "revoke" used to describe rights and privileges, I would like to describe more detail to my situation that is I am the system administrator, and the user asked me to return to the previous procedure say B, as C is not correct. But procedures D,E and F are approval steps that made by some department's managers. So, the such request should get approval from manages before action.

    Whether "revoke" is valid to use? And what is the best sentence to express this action(rollback/revoke/undo)?

    Between, I would like to know how to use rollback in this situation if it dose not violate the forums' rule(as its seems another question in one post :) ).

    I am sorry for my poor question if it has disturbed you.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Thanks for the explanation, Jason. I think that "revoke" makes more sense in describing an action in which you cancel something that somebody has already approved. As it is so often used in legal contexts, however, I'd still recommend another verb such as "cancel" or "reject".

    If you really wanted to use "revoke" for some reason, you could say something like: "I'm revoking the authorization/approval for procedures C through G."

    SD Graham's "roll back" could be used in the right sentence: " Mr. X, please roll the project back to procedure B. We will have to redo steps C through G because they aren't working."
     

    jasonforce

    New Member
    Cantonese
    Thank you Owl Man and SD Graham again!

    So, I can answer the user "The record has been rolled back." or ""I've revoked the the procedures C through G. Please start at B again.", right? :)

    Actually, I really want to use "revoke" or some words to express the severity of doing such rollback action, as most of user does not respect to the system as they just treat it as a recording tools, but actually its not.

    Its my first question in this forum, I feel its the right place for my English leaning. Thank you so much!
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You seem to have a good understanding of what "revoke" means now, Jason. If you want to highlight the seriousness of the canceled procedures, you could use "revoke". If you do, I suggest that you write something like: I'm revoking the authorization/approval for procedures C through G. Then people will clearly understand what "revoke" means in the context. It sounds strange to speak of "revoking" procedures, as they are not ordinarily viewed as rights, privileges, or authority.
     
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