Revolving-door relationship

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aquinn_21

New Member
India, English
Hi everyone,

I have come across this phrase : "revolving-door relationship". I want to find out the meaning of such an expression and also the origin of it..
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Hi Aquinn,

    welcome to the forum.

    It is hard to reply without knowing the context. Let me tell you what it could be if it were related to politics/economics:

    "Revolving door" is used to describe the behavior of government officials who, after leaving the government, start working in the industry that they regulated previously, thereby casting doubt on the impartiality of the regulation.

    Jana
     

    zebedee

    Senior Member
    Gt. Britain - English
    Hello Aquinn and welcome to the Forums.

    When you ask for help with an expression, please always try to include an example sentence or some kind of context to help us to give you the correct definition.

    Without a context, I could say that a "revolving door relationship" is a narrow relationship of mutual interest between two entities or people. It's based on the type of revolving doors you sometimes find in hotels/airports etc which turn like carousels letting people in and out at the same time.

    If you can, please post us the context so we can help you better.

    Regards,
    zeb
     

    aquinn_21

    New Member
    India, English
    Thanks for the replies yes here is the context in which it has been used:

    A front-page London New Statesman article on May 30 revealed that Oxfam's revolving-door relationship with chancellor Gordon Brown has neutered the demands, strategies and tactics of the 450-member NGO campaign, 'Make Poverty History'. The website of the British magazine Red Pepper followed up with a devastating political critique of the campaign, including a refusal to countenance any anti-war message that will embarrass Brown and Tony Blair.

    hope that makes it little easier...
     

    aquinn_21

    New Member
    India, English
    that seems like it.....but hey could anyone just give me a site or something where i can look up idioms/phrases...i know websites which give dictionary meanings and etc...
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    aquinn_21 said:
    that seems like it.....but hey could anyone just give me a site or something where i can look up idioms/phrases...i know websites which give dictionary meanings and etc...
    Here, here, here, here and here are some but idioms are just so many... The best thing to do when you meet an unknown idiom is to consult a good dictionary or ask here, I am sorry. :)

    Jana
     

    la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Jana337 said:
    Here, here, here, here and here are some but idioms are just so many... The best thing to do when you meet an unknown idiom is to consult a good dictionary or ask here, I am sorry. :)

    Jana
    Jana's given you some excellent ones. Here's another to complement them.
    Idioms is the fifth category down:

    http://www.answers.com/main/words.jsp

    Now you'll have many of the idioms in English "at your fingertips." :)
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It's the kind of open relationship we have on a forum, isn't it, coming and going, mutually interested, no strings. Cool :cool:
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Hi, I've found this >>> An analysis by Boyce (1992, World Development, 20, pp. 335–349) for the Philippines revealed the presence of contemporaneous bi-directional causality, in other words, a financial revolving door relationship between external debt and capital flight in that economy.>> here
     
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