Rich and complex Mr. Peet tinkers

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
What does "Rich and complex Mr. Peet tinkers" mean? It seems that "tinker" here means "improve" - Mr.Peet, who was rich and sophisticated, improved the coffee's taste. Well, I am not sure at all.

Thanks in advance

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Peet's Coffee Major Dickason's Blend Deep Roast, Whole Bean (32 oz.).Rich and complex Mr. Peet tinkers.Before you know it, our all-time bestseller is born.Peet's Coffee Major Dickason's Blend Deep Roast Whole Bean Coffee Tasting Notes: Rich

-Peet's Coffee

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  • NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    It's actually:

    Rich and complex.

    Mr. Peet tinkers. Before you know it, our all-time bestseller is born.​
    What does "tinker" mean there?

    Our dictionary says: tinker:
    1. to work with a thing without useful results:She likes to tinker with the car.
    2. to work clumsily at anything.
    Not suitable here.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It's the first one, but I find the definition rather terse and unhelpful because no one would do "tinker" if they expected no results to ever come of it. It's more like experimenting. You are trying things that are somewhat random with the hopes of a good result.
    He probably tried different types and combinations of beans, roasting them in different ways, etc until he got a good result.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Yeah, Mr. Peet was gradually improving his way all along. Not tinkering at all. I think the word tinker here is misused.
     
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    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    What does "tinker" mean there?

    Our dictionary says: tinker:
    1. to work with a thing without useful results:She likes to tinker with the car.
    2. to work clumsily at anything.
    Not suitable here.
    I think many people would say he was tinkering with his recipe. I don't think the dictionary is clear at all.
    :thumbsup:

    The Collins entry does not require the results to be useless

    tinker (intransitive)
    followed by with: to play, fiddle, or meddle (with machinery, etc), esp while undertaking repairs

    Edit: I looked at a few more dictionaries and there may be an AE emphasis on the failure of the attempt, while BE does not have "failure" as such a strong part of the meaning.
     
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    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've heard "tinkers" nearly all my AE life, and "failure" was never part of the definition in my mind.

    Looking more closely, I see this second definition for tinker in the WR Random House Dictionary: to work clumsily at anything.

    I've never had that in mind for "tinker" either. So either I've lived my life in ignorance of the real meaning of "tinker," or Random House isn't reporting the way I and my friends use it.
     
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