Ride shotgun

miah

New Member
english- england
hi could anyone please tell me what 'you ride shotgun' means also if someone would translate it for me in spanish, id be grateful.
 
  • jinti

    Senior Member
    It means you ride in the front seat (passenger side) of a car/truck. It can also sometimes mean you guard someone or something during the trip.

    I suppose the origin of the phrase is that since the driver is busy driving, the passenger in the front seat can protect him or the vehicle with a shotgun.

    Sorry, I don't know how to say it in Spanish....
     

    Marthafromsf

    Member
    US-California-English
    The term comes from the days when a stagecoach driver would have someone ride next to him on the driver's seat, with a shotgun to fend off outlaws.
    So today it means to sit in the passenger's seat, usually of a car.
    I don't know what that would be in Spanish!

    My attempt would be:
    Siéntate en el asiento de pasajero.

    Hope that helps.

    Martha
     

    diegodbs

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    COLsass said:
    someone rides shotgun when they take the front seat--that is, the person next to the driver.
    En España solemos decir "asiento del copiloto" pero en otros países no lo sé.
     

    aleCcowaN

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    then

    you ride shotgun = viaja en el asiento del acompañante

    (pasajeros son todos excepto el conductor)
     

    oriental

    Senior Member
    Spanish-R.O.Uruguay
    miah said:
    hi could anyone please tell me what 'you ride shotgun' means also if someone would translate it for me in spanish, id be grateful.
    Hola!
    As said by Marthafromsf "The term comes from the days when a stagecoach driver would have someone ride next to him on the driver's seat, with a shotgun to fend off outlaws.
    So today it means to sit in the passenger's seat, usually of a car."

    COLsass also said "someone rides shotgun when they take the front seat--that is, the person next to the driver."

    Those phrases point at the place, not at the function.
    Up to now, I thougt that "riding shotgun" was said of a person going with someone, to take care of whatever problem may arise.
    Maybe you can provide context, and some fellow forero may clarify that point to me.
    Thanks.
     

    problemas

    New Member
    english
    I really don't think the phrase has anything to do with protecting anything, it just refers to sitting in the pasenger seat.
     

    JB

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    En España solemos decir "asiento del copiloto" pero en otros países no lo sé.
    1. Al leer La Opinion, un diario en Los Angeles para la comunidad hispanohablante, hace un par de días, vi una foto de una mujer, con la leyenda piloto. Para mí, un piloto maneja una avión. Al leer el artículo, del contexto fue obvio que ella es "piloto" de un coche de carrera, famoso porque es mejor, y además latina.

    Quisiera saber si, en otros países, aparte de españa, también usan la palabra piloto para un conductor.

    2. Querido Oriental (re Martha's post): If you rent or check out some old Westerns on DVD or VHS, you will see, over and over, two cowboys, one choosing, or assigned to be, the "driver" (the idea of driving cattle or horses, or a stagecoach or buckboard, preceded that of driving a car), and the other being "shotgun" I don't know that they always used a shotgun (escopeta). I think sometimes they carried regular rifles. If you are old enough to remember when the (U.S:)TV screens were filled with Maverick, Wagon Train, Wanted Dead or Alive, Have Gun Will Travel, Gunsmoke, and a million others, not to mention movies with John Wayne, Crash Corrigan, Gene Autry, the Lone Ranger and Tonto, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, etc., you wouldn't have to ask.
    This is one of those rare moments when being older makes me feel wiser.

    De todos modos, para regresar a la pregunta original, ¿existe en español una expresión idiomática que equivale?
     

    jarol_antonio

    Member
    Spanish, Colombia
    Hola!
    As said by Marthafromsf "The term comes from the days when a stagecoach driver would have someone ride next to him on the driver's seat, with a shotgun to fend off outlaws.
    So today it means to sit in the passenger's seat, usually of a car."

    COLsass also said "someone rides shotgun when they take the front seat--that is, the person next to the driver."

    Those phrases point at the place, not at the function.
    Up to now, I thougt that "riding shotgun" was said of a person going with someone, to take care of whatever problem may arise.
    Maybe you can provide context, and some fellow forero may clarify that point to me.
    Thanks.
    I never thought it was about the wild west, but then again I was never into westerns. This is silly but I always thought it had to do with drive by shootings. I get shot gun.

    >H.A.M.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    The "shotgun seat" is the front seat, next to the driver. It has the best view, compared to those in back. American kids almost always compete for the privilege of sitting there.
     

    Soy Yo

    Senior Member
    USA
    EEUU - inglés
    Lo que se ha dicho del "stagecoach" explica el origen de la expresión...pero la idea de proteger o ayudar se ha perdido con el tiempo. La persona que "gets shotgun" o "rides shotgun" se sienta en el asiento al lado del conductor...y tiene ventana, un asiento (quizá) más comodo, puede ver mejor, no se marea tan fácilmente... en otras palabras se siente privilegiada (es el pasajero que tiene el mejor asiento).
     

    AndyE

    New Member
    English Isle of Man
    En nuestra familia, cuando viajamos en coche, gritamos "Shotgun!" para reservar ese asiento.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Lo que se ha dicho del "stagecoach" explica el origen de la expresión...pero la idea de proteger o ayudar se ha perdido con el tiempo. La persona que "gets shotgun" o "rides shotgun" se sienta en el asiento al lado del conductor...y tiene ventana, un asiento (quizá) más comodo, puede ver mejor, no se marea tan fácilmente... en otras palabras se siente privilegiada (es el pasajero que tiene el mejor asiento).
    :thumbsup:
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    ...y tiene ventana, un asiento (quizá) más comodo, puede ver mejor, no se marea tan fácilmente... en otras palabras se siente privilegiada (es el pasajero que tiene el mejor asiento).
    ...and when it comes to your kids, the one who rides shotgun controls the car's audio system...:D
     

    lucylinecm

    Senior Member
    English- US
    Up to now, I thougt that "riding shotgun" was said of a person going with someone, to take care of whatever problem may arise.
    Maybe you can provide context, and some fellow forero may clarify that point to me.
    Thanks.[/QUOTE]

    No, cuando dice "Shotgun!" cuando esta al punto de entrar en el carro, solo significa una cosa- que quiere montar en el asiento al lado del conductor.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top