Ride the metro

Arthur Korablyov

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!

Can I say like this if I mean that there are a lot of people in the tube at rush hour and my bag is pressed by people and is far away from me (but I still hold it):

My bag and I always ride the metro separately.


Thank you in advance!
 
  • JuanEscritor

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    Hello!

    Can I say like this if I mean that there are a lot of people in the tube at rush hour and my bag is pressed by people and is far away from me (but I still hold it):

    My bag and I always ride the metro separately.


    Thank you in advance!
    By tube do you mean the car?

    I think in the U.S. using metro to refer to the subway is rare; other than that I think your sentence sounds good. There is clearly some humor in it.

    JE
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Metro isn't really rare in AmE - that's what the subway is called in Washington, D.C., and (I think) Atlanta, Ga. How people refer to these things varies a lot by region. I think subway is possibly the best general term, though. Keep in mind that it means something completely different in BE.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you say "My bag and I always ride the metro separately." it sounds humorous. However, without a separate explanation, I would not imagine you were holding onto it. I would think that it was left on a seat or the floor.
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I get the same picture as Biffo: you are in one car, or one section of a car, and your bag is in another. Perhaps as a lifelong rider of crowded subways, I cannot picture how a crowd pressing in would move the bag away from your body.

    Edited for typos.
     
    Last edited:

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    The sentence is very funny, though I agree that what it immediately makes me think of is you in one place, your bag in another (a baggage compartment or something). But if your very next sentence explains what you mean - that it's the crowd who separates you from your bag - it's fine, or so it seems to me. The joke is good but it does need some explanation.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    This sentence doesn't work for me. I understand that you're trying to be funny, but how can you be riding separately if you are still holding on to the bag? I would find it confusing.

    But I might say "On the Metro, it's all I can do to hold hands with my bag." This reminds me of trying to keep track of a child who is pulling away from you.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This sentence doesn't work for me. I understand that you're trying to be funny, but how can you be riding separately if you are still holding on to the bag? I would find it confusing.
    Yes, my first thought was that you and the bag went on different trains (which left me wondering how the bag knows when to get off).
     
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