ride to the Capitol

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Jofre

Senior Member
español
Dear friends,

I want to inform myself about Franklin Roosevelt, went to this website, and the first phrase that appears says:
"The former Governor of New York rode to the Capitol with President Hoover."
What does "ride to the Capitol" mean? I firstly thought it was about riding with motorcicles like in a President's procession. Do you know the meaning? Thanks!
Capture d’écran 2013-11-04 à 19.05.27.jpg
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The page you've linked is about Franklin Roosevelt's first inaugural address, so presumably the reference is to his first inauguration as president.

    Traditionally, the outgoing and incoming presidents ride together from the White House to the U.S. Capitol in an open limousine, so your first impression would be correct.
     

    ESustad

    Senior Member
    English - (Minnesota)
    Note that "Capitol" is a proper noun, and refers to the actual building in Washington, DC, housing the US Legislature. Normally a seat of government is spelled "capital."
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Jofre, were you perhaps unaware that it is perfectly common, ordinary, everyday English to describe the passengers in an automobile, or in a bus, or on a train, as "riding" in it?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Well, American English doesn't use "ride" for a car. We "ride in" a car, but the trip from one place to another is a ride... in a car.

    You don't ride in/on a train in British English, se16teddy?

    "We rode down from London on the train" seems like a very common thing to read in a book from the UK.
     
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    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    In British English, you "ride" a bicycle, motor-bike, horse, donkey or camel.
    In British English, you can also ride in conveyances, just as you do in American English. Here, for example, is something found on the website of Westminster Abbey, which I don't think anyone would argue is insufficiently British:
    The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh left Westminster Abbey at 2.53 and rode in the State Coach through the streets of London before returning to Buckingham Palace.
    http://www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/royals/coronations/elizabeth-ii

    And here is something from that most British of all newspapers, the Sun:
    The Queen rode in a carriage with Camilla for the third time in a week
    http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4976482/Maam-Cam-at-Ascot.html

    Shall we leave out the Telegraph? Not at all:
    A Spaniard and a Swede also riding in the car were injured.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...r-crash-sparks-accusations-of-conspiracy.html

    So it seems that in British English, one may also ride in a coach, carriage, or car...

    EDIT: JamesM, they also ride the underground. Here is Emma Barnett, the Women's Editor of the Telegraph:
    having not let these thoughtless ‘lads’ get away with talking to me like I just rode the tube for their enjoyment.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/wo...ed-me-on-the-bus.-My-reaction-shocked-me.html
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    [...]
    "We rode down from London on the train" seems like a very common thing to read in a book from the UK.
    I confess, I would find that quite strange in a UK context, James....

    (That said, I really don't want to turn this into a debate about BrE usage;).)
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    JamesM, did you see my edit at the end of post #11? And Loob, is "rode the tube" a special case, as opposed to "rode the train"?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I am not sure what the examples from British newspapers and so on are are intended to prove. There may be an article of the US constitution banning Brits from high office in church, state and press, but the reverse is not true. If you use the word "ride" of public transport in London, you are American, or imitating American habits.

    "The Queen/Lord Mayor rode in her carriage" sounds OK to me. We use "ride" for ceremonial events. (Though in her younger days the Queen often attended ceremonies on horseback.)
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I am not sure what the examples from British newspapers and so on are are intended to prove. ........
    ...... If you use the word "ride" of public transport in London, you are American, or imitating American habits.
    Likewise. Apart from the use of "ride in a carriage" the other examples seem to me to be unusual usage, especially the Spaniard and the Swede riding in the car. However, on loking at that web page, it is obvious that the text is taken straight from an agency report, not written in BE ("rental car", "called Monday")

    The riding the Tube example is easier to accept within that particular context, but we certainlg don't "ride the Tube to Waterloo" or "ride in the Tube to Euston" - or to anywhere else. We "take" or "get" it.

    I have no doubt that other examples of riding transport could be found in BE text, but all that would demonstrate is that some people write in unusual ways.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We have several British people telling us that passengers in a chauffeur-driven vehicle aren't riding in the car, but none of you are telling us what they are doing. It's very frustrating. Are they passenging perhaps? ;)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    They are being driven in it - "The former Governor of New York was driven to the Capitol with President Hoover."
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    We have several British people telling us that passengers in a chauffeur-driven vehicle aren't riding in the car, but none of you are telling us what they are doing. [...]
    Well, this British person has no problem with riding in a car. I wouldn't "ride a car", nor would I "ride a bus" or "ride a train", but I'd quite naturally say "I prefer to ride in the back of a car" or "Riding on crowded buses makes me feel sick". Does that make me unusual, Andy? ... or ceremonial, teddy? ;)

    Ws:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, this British person has no problem with riding in a car. I wouldn't "ride a car", nor would I "ride a bus" or "ride a train", but I'd quite naturally say "I prefer to ride in the back of a car" or "Riding on crowded buses makes me feel sick". Does that make me unusual, Andy? ... or ceremonial, teddy? ;)
    I think one of the issues here is that we Brits are so familiar with AmE usage that it's hard to be categorical about how BrE usage differs: I'm sure that there are many BrE-speakers who would, like you, say "I prefer to ride in the back of a car". I wouldn't say it myself, but if I was giving you a lift and you said this to me, I wouldn't fall over in amazement. I might, privately, think "Oo-er, that sounds a bit American!" but my second thought would be "Oh, you're probably just behind the times, grandma-Loob...."
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, this British person has no problem with riding in a car. I wouldn't "ride a car", nor would I "ride a bus" or "ride a train", but I'd quite naturally say "I prefer to ride in the back of a car" or "Riding on crowded buses makes me feel sick". Does that make me unusual, Andy? ... or ceremonial, teddy? ;)

    Ws:)
    I do see those as unusual. For me those would have to be "I prefer to sit in the back of a car" and "Travelling (or going) on crowded buses makes me feel sick". I'd never use "to ride" in either of those contexts.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    It's true that my BrE has been a tad influenced by past globetrotting, so I'll have to bow to the others' views on the Britishness of this one.

    [But since I'm bowing to Andy, Loob and Teddy (is that a coincidence, or what?!), I might wonder if there isn't some sort of group effect here!:D — No? OK, time to go home.]

    Ws:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    ...[But since I'm bowing to Andy, Loob and Teddy (is that a coincidence, or what?!), I might wonder if there isn't some sort of group effect here!:D — No? OK, time to go home.]
    Brilliant, Ws!

    Waving goodbye....:D:D:D




    -----------
    [EDIT: for those who're mystified, there was a BBC TV children's programme with characters Andy Pandy, Looby Loo, and Teddy. The catch-phrases included "Time to go home" and "Andy is waving goodbye":).]
     
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