rifiutare un voto

calcifer

New Member
Italian
Salve a tutti, sono nuova di questo forum ma mi piace già un sacco :)

Devo tradurre la seguente frase:
comunicare al docente (blah, indicazioni di come) il rifiuto della votazione conseguita

E' corretto scrivere così?

contacting the teacher (blah) in order to reject the test result.

Grazie!!!!!
 
  • "Contact the teacher (indication of how to do it) to reject the ballot"

    Instead of ballot/vote/poll which words mean the process of election you could say "to reject the proposal" or "vote against the proposal" which makes more sense in English

    If votazione can also mean the results of an exam then "contact the teacher to appeal against your examination grade"
     

    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    If votazione can also mean the results of an exam then "contact the teacher to appeal against your examination grade"
    Hi Robert (long time - no see, huh? ;))

    Actually here the meaning of votazione IS definitely the results of an exam.

    It simply means you don't like it (your test/exam score) and you want another try, so you reject your mark/grade/results/score. It happens a lot when you're at university, here... :D I can tell... :p
     

    calcifer

    New Member
    Italian
    hi everyone thanks for the replies!
    Azazel, it happens just TOO often!!!! :)
    I liked the "appeal against" translation, but I don't want to give the students the idea they can bargain grades :)
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Salve a tutti.

    Riapro questo thread perché mi pare che la questione non sia stata risolta del tutto. Vorrei anche io sapere come si dice "rifiutare un voto" (ossia, comunicare all'insegnante la propria decisione di non volere che il voto assegnato sia registrato) nel contesto accademico, ammesso che tale pratica sia vigente anche nei paesi di lingua inglese.

    - Frase esempio:
    Ho preso 22 nell'esame di X, ma siccome avevo studiato molto ho deciso di rifiutare il voto.

    - Tentativo di traduzione:
    I got a 22 on the X exam, but since I had studied a lot I decided to {refuse / reject / appeal against} the grade.

    Su Internet ho trovato qualche risultato con "refuse", mentre "appeal against" è il suggerimento fornito all'interno di questo stesso thread (anche se a me personalmente pare poco convincente).

    Grazie in anticipo.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    you don't like it (your test/exam score) and you want another try, so you reject your mark/grade/results/score.
    I never heard of such a thing in England, though that doesn’t necessarily mean it doesn’t exist (I speak as a university graduate). What level of education are we talking about?
    I don't want to give the students the idea they can bargain grades :)
    Swings and roundabouts, I reckon. In England we tend to give you one chance, and if you don’t do well you may be able to appeal, but unless you can actually prove adverse circumstances were in effect or a qualified third party considers the original grade incorrect – you can lump it (or whistle for it, as an ex-colleague of mine from Dawlish said quite frequently).

    Literally, I suppose ‘reject’ would do at a pinch, but what seems more likely in English to me is that you skip the part about not accepting the grade and just ‘request a resit’, something which you’re unlikely to do for the fun of it. ;)
     

    QuasiTriestino

    Senior Member
    American English
    In the States, you can "contest" a grade or a decision if you feel it was unfair or not warranted. (Now whether or not the professor cares about your appeals is up to him/her.) You can't really "refuse" anything because it's there in black and white.

    You can "appeal" to have the grade changed, but you're not "appealing" a grade.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Thanks everyone for your contribution. I think I'll go with "decide to retake / resit an exam".

    University grades can be appealed. There is usually a process, beginning with speaking with the instructor.
    What I'm referring to is way simpler, nowhere as formal as that (although I suppose there may have been instances where a grade has actually been formally appealed). Say you take an oral exam; after being examined the teacher tells you the grade and asks you: "Accetta o rifiuta"? If you're not satisfied with the grade you've been given, you can say: "Rifiuto", and the teacher will usually dismiss you by saying something along the lines of: "Ci vediamo al prossimo appello, allora". Something similar happens with written exams, with the sole difference that you usually don't inform the teacher in person.
     

    QuasiTriestino

    Senior Member
    American English
    Say you take an oral exam; after being examined the teacher tells you the grade and asks you: "Accetta o rifiuta"? If you're not satisfied with the grade you've been given, you can say: "Rifiuto", and the teacher will usually dismiss you by saying something along the lines of: "Ci vediamo al prossimo appello, allora".
    Ahhh, I've never heard of a this happening where I'm from. It's usually incumbent on the student to ask the professor as pointed out above. My impression is that in the US we take far fewer oral exams than students take in Europe, so maybe it's something we think less about and consequently don't have a great way of expressing. I think "deciding to retake the exam" is a good bet.
     
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