right rear tire is walled ( tire is bald )

presl

Senior Member
Hi! What does ‘right rear tire is walled’ mean? Thanks.


[Warehouse 13]

Bonnie [FBI Agent]: ... I need video. I need tech out here right now.

Myka [Secret Service Agent]: It's a gray van, no windows, no plates, and the right rear tire is walled. They're using a record player, like a Close'N Play.
 
  • presl

    Senior Member
    The only thing I can think of is that the car has "whitewall" tires. Those tires have a broad white strip as in this photo.
    Hi! Dimcl, thanks for your reply.

    Do you mean it refers to the tire with strip on its side, but whatever color it is - it is also possible that it is 'redwall', 'bulewall', etc. - not only refers to 'whitewall tire'. Is that what you meant?
     

    lablady

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It is indeed possible that tires could have other colors of walls (I once saw a car with red stripes on the tires). However, whitewalls were once very common so I would assume that anyone speaking only of a "walled tire" would be referring to a whitewall tire. The other colors are unusual enough that I would think that Myka would have specified the color if it were anything but white.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I suspect it might mean that the right rear tire is worn on the sides. Otherwise isn't any tire "walled", even without color added on the sides?
    Is this is a technical use of "walled"? I am not finding anything on the internet with this use.

    In this particular case, it appears that they are describing the car so that it can be identified. It seems to me more likely that they would expect someone to notice that a tire was whitewalled than that it was worn.
     
    Last edited:

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Why didn't Myka say, if this is what was meant, "... and a whitewall right rear tire" or "... and a whitewall tire on the right rear" or "and a redwall tire on the right rear" (or whatever color)?

    I am guessing, but I think a worn-out tire is the more likely meaning of a tire that is "walled", with no color specified.
     

    presl

    Senior Member
    Is the tire mentioned anywhere else in the dialog? Why is it mentioned here?
    No, it isn't mentioned in the other dialog. And the problem is, I could not see the right rear tire and other tires in the scene, except the left rear tire, and it does not seem to be a whitewall tire.

    Myka was chasing three bank robbers. After a fight, one of them was taken by Myka on the ground and the other two got away with a gray van. In my quotation, Myka was describing what happend to the a group of FBI Agents and her fellow Agent who just hit the crime scene later.


    Which episode is this?
    It is the Episode 03, Resonance.

    Well, after re-watching this scene, it seems she says, as you suggested, ‘bald’, but it also like ‘walled’. I just could not hear exactly, because she does not pronounce this word pretty clearly. But all the scripts I got [I have got a lot of different versions of the script of this episode] both show that she says 'and the right rear tire is walled.'


    Is this is a technical use of "walled"? I am not finding anything on the internet with this use.
    I could not find it either.

     

    presl

    Senior Member
    Why didn't Myka say, if this is what was meant, "... and a whitewall right rear tire" or "... and a whitewall tire on the right rear" or "and a redwall tire on the right rear" (or whatever color)?

    I am guessing, but I think a worn-out tire is the more likely meaning of a tire that is "walled", with no color specified.


    Forero, I just found something while I was re-watching the scene. There is another tire on the right side in the van, which seems to be a spare tire or the tire has just been replaced. Then I am guessing if Myka means the bank robbers replaced the right rear tire because it is worn-out ?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    If she says "bald", then she means "worn out", the meaning Forero is proposing for "walled", except that "bald" means that the treads are worn out where the tire hits the road.

    As James says, "bald" is a very ordinary thing to say about tires.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Bald makes much more sense than (white)walled. Who does these transcriptions?

    (Actually I've had tires that were worn out on both the treads and the walls - alopecia præcox I presume.)
     

    presl

    Senior Member
    Bald makes much more sense than (white)walled. Who does these transcriptions?

    I do not exactly know who they are. [some English enthusiast?] But it is hard to find these scripts though, since it is a new show.

    The pronunciation of these two words is too similar, which is difficult for me to differentiate them. Thanks for JamesM’s helping out , I work it out this time.

    And Forero, Cagey, lablady, Dimcl, thanks. :D
     
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