Rilassarsi

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carolinskaya

Senior Member
italian
Ciao a tutti! :D
Volevo sapere se nell'inglese colloquiale è possibile trovare "chill" invece di "chill out" in una frase il cui significato di "chill out" sia "rilassarsi". Se voglio dire "Mi sto rilassando" posso, in forma colloquiale, dire "I'm chilling" ?
Thanks! :D
 
  • MStraf

    Senior Member
    "I am chilling" significa "ho freddo" (and in this season you hear it often in households where people fight to gain control of the thermostat :) , ask my wife)

    "To chill" e "to chill out" sono cose diverse.
     

    carolinskaya

    Senior Member
    italian
    Ok! but at this point if I read a sentence like this " Mary is chilling while waiting for her friend" without any context around, how is it possible to understand if Mary is relaxing or she is out of her home waiting for her friend in a bad weather?:confused:
     

    ExoticMuse

    New Member
    USA
    English-United States
    In this context, I would say Mary is waiting for her friend. If she is waiting for her friend in bad weather there are usually other context clues. In US English, usually chilling means waiting for a friend.
     

    carolinskaya

    Senior Member
    italian
    In this context, I would say Mary is waiting for her friend. If she is waiting for her friend in bad weather there are usually other context clues. In US English, usually chilling means waiting for a friend.
    What!? very confused now!:confused:
    OK! I'm trying to make the point of all this thing!
     

    pescara

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    "I am chilling" significa "ho freddo" (and in this season you hear it often in households where people fight to gain control of the thermostat :) , ask my wife)

    "To chill" e "to chill out" sono cose diverse.
    "I'm chilly" means "ho freddo." "I'm chilling" or "I'm chilling out" are colloquial expresions that mean I'm relaxing or waiting for someone/something.

    Ciao.
     

    pescara

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    Ok! but at this point if I read a sentence like this " Mary is chilling while waiting for her friend" without any context around, how is it possible to understand if Mary is relaxing or she is out of her home waiting for her friend in a bad weather?:confused:
    If I read this sentence with no other context, I would interpret it as: Mary is relaxing while waiting for her friend. The sentence would imply nothing about the weather.

    Ciao.
     

    Villa fan

    Senior Member
    In the UK, we would say in colloquial English "I am chilling". (rilassarsi/svagarsi). If we are very cold, we would say "I'm frozen" (ho freddo). "I am chilled with your decision" tends to mean "I'm not bothered either way". (non preoccuparsi)

    I hope that helps.
     
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