Rind [pork belly]

palabra86

Senior Member
Spanish
Sorry that sound graphic I just try to understand new words I found. I wonder if "rind" means skin?

The basic raw material for example a piece of pork belly. we now cut off the rind, this contains the collagen that gelatin is made of.
(Vido about gelatin)
 
  • Dryan

    Senior Member
    English - Northeastern U.S.
    Yes rind means skin here.
    We actually fry and eat pork rinds on their own kind of like chicharrones/crackling.
     

    grumpyaudeman

    Member
    English
    Rind in English is often used as skin/peel
    < --- >

    You love it in English as Pork Scratchings < --- >

    < Spanish removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It could also refer to certain fruit, so it doesn't just relate to animals.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I use "skin" when the meat is completely raw.
    When it's smoked pork belly (bacon), cooked or uncooked, I call it rind.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Just a couple more comments… The rind of lemons and oranges etc. is more commonly called peel. And rind can also relate to cheese.

    In the UK (and in my experience), rind is used almost exclusively to describe the skin on bacon. If you were making crackling, you’d probably describe it as crackling the skin of your pork joint, not the rind.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I was a little surprised by the results of the Ngram database* showing peel being only a bit more frequent (in the books database, at least) than rind when specifying orange and lemon and both are much more frequent than pork rind or bacon rind.

    *searched for: orange rind,lemon rind,hard rind,pork rind,bacon rind,orange peel,lemon peel
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    For me, "pork rinds" are the fried and roasted snack usually packaged like potato chips ("crisps") in bags, but also available in jars.

    It was a favorite of President George H.W. Bush. (Reagan liked jelly beans and I side with Reagan.)

     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    According to a writer at the Chicago Tribune, this is the difference between a fruit peel and a fruit rind.

    While the terms lemon rind and zest can be used interchangeably, the peel is something different. The peel is the entire outer covering of any citrus fruit, including the colored, exterior portion as well as the spongy, white pith just beneath it. Rind or zest usually refers only to the thin outer layer that is colored. Rich with citrus oils, this is the most flavorful part of the peel and is the part most often used in recipes.

    Q. Can you clear up the difference...
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I was thinking just in the fruit category, and since there is no such thing as a watermelon peel. :)

    But I guess orange and lemon win just because they are much more common fruits, in general.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think there’s an AE/BE difference in a lot of this terminology. For example, I’d never heard of candied [orange or lemon] rind as opposed to peel, but evidently it is also called that.
     
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