rinderpest

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Hello!
Sorry for a silly question but I've been trying to elicit this from the dictionaries, yet nothing truly conclusive comes out... 'Rinderpest' is normally used with regard to cattle but what about a die-off of wild animals? Can anybody imagine talking about 'rinderpest' with regard to forest animals?

Thanks.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It does seem to be very specific, Setwale: here's the OED definition:

    A virulent, infectious disease affecting ruminant animals, esp. oxen, characterized by fever, dysentery, and inflammation of the mucous membranes; cattle-plague.

    What is it you want to say?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    No, I don't think it would: it seems to be as specific to cattle as myxomatosis is to rabbits, and to refer, as you say, to the disease rather than the result.

    Without seeing your context, it's difficult to come up with ideas. Do you want to give us some more background, and try out a few options?
     
    Well, I do not know, we are just talking about bears dropping dead in large quantities... The irony comes from the fact that in some Eastern European countries there is a common saying when something absolutely unexpected, out of the way happens, like a careless husband calls you up to say something tender or somebody chronically stupid suddenly comes up with something brilliant, people say: Now, a bear must have dropped dead in the forest! So the mention of the epidemic mortality of bears has a subtle sarcastic reference to that association.

    P.S. By the way, congrats, you are doing very well hitting your 3rd milestone exactly on your first anniversary here:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Mmm, difficult. Perhaps just "an epidemic of dead bears"?

    Thank you for the congratulations - I hadn't realised it was a year ago tomorrow that I first fell under the spell!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    According to the Wiki entry it "affects some wildlife".

    Since 1999 there has been an effective vaccine against this virus (also from the Wiki entry).

    Keep in mind that many people in urban areas will not be familiar with this term and you might not be communicating at all by using it. I asked 6 people at work what the word meant and none had ever heard the word before (including this writer).
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Keep in mind that many people in urban areas will not be familiar with this term and you might not be communicating at all by using it.:tick::tick:
    (I thought it was some kind of annoying pig:D)

    How about beartality? bearocaust? [too controversial?], bear-loss? [geddit? ~ like hair loss] ...

    No, I will not suggest beareavement.
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    I think Ewie is thinking along the right lines. :D Rinderpest is a German word known to just about everyone above the age of 6 in Germany. Judging by the comments in earlier posts, the term is not so widely known elsewhere, even though it appears to be the accepted name for the disease in English, too, at least among Vets.

    I suggest you steer clear of Rinderpest and use a made-up word (perhaps not quite so far-fetched as those suggested by Ewie) or, as suggested earlier, "an epidemic of bears." Have you considered "Bears are dying that have never died before"? :)
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    Oh dear, this is getting unbearable. Teddious, even.

    Getting back to the question, what do my fellow clowns think about "a Terminursus"?
    "A debruination," perhaps?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Setwale_Charm said:
    ...to sarcastically describe the epidemic mortality of bears in the wild
    "forests bare of bears"





    ____________________
    "
    If a bear approaches while you are fishing, ....stop fishing." U.S. Dep't. of Agriculture, Forest Service
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    At Ewie's bare-faced request, this cloven-hooved/hoofed conversation is going into
    hibernation. That is not Hibernian cyberspace, just in case you were wondering.
     
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