riotously bursting free of movie-business formula

wilsyls

Member
Chinese(but I'm a Taiwanese)
I just came across a movie review. In it there was this description "a frothy fairy tale, both trivial and weighty at once, that simultaneously uses tried-and-true romantic comedy convention while riotously bursting free of movie-business formula".

After studying this description a bit I decided to come here and seek help because I just don't know what this part "riotously bursting free of movie-business formula" here means. I originally thought "bursting" here means "bursting into laughter", but still this part of the description leaves me scratching my head :confused:

I hope you guys can help me figure out what this part of the description means. Thank you guys :)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s a rather florid way of making a comparison between two extremes, expressed two different ways — 1. trivial v. weighty (= frivolous v. serious), 2. standard romcom format v. something quite new, differing from the way things are normally done.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Bursting" must be paired with "free" here, with the same meaning as "breaking free": The movie breaks away from the restraints or rules of traditional movies, described here as "movie-business formula." The writer likely wanted to be more original and emphatic in their use of "bursting" instead of the usual "breaking."
    "Formula" describes the tropes and contrivances that are used by most movies, particularly those that are made to fit a mold or pattern that ensures sales—hence, the emphasis on "movie-business."
     

    wilsyls

    Member
    Chinese(but I'm a Taiwanese)
    Thank you lingobingo, Florentia52 and Florentia52 for replying, and yes Florentia52 that's the article that I came across. Thank you for providing the source on my behalf.

    I just can't find this usage "burst free" on the web by the way. But it seems "bursting free" here only makes sense when the term means "breaking free".
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I just can't find this usage "burst free" on the web by the way. But it seems "bursting free" here only makes sense when the term means "breaking free".
    That is what it means. Burst free is just a stronger version of break free, and there are lots of examples of it on the Web.
     
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