rip Jumbo there's tongue out

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
During court hearings, an expert delivers a speech against the accused Ray and Gabe (actually they are innocent). Gabe to Ray:
- When this is over, remind me to rip Jumbo there's tongue out.
- With a tow truck.

Tango & Cash, movie

What does that mean...? I understand the idea -- they want to rip the expert's tongue out. But what does the rest of the phrase mean? (cross-posted with Florentia)
Thank you.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "Remind me to rip out the tongue of that guy there."

    Is the expert witness particularly large or small? That might explain why Gabe is referring to him as "Jumbo."
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    No, he doesn't look large at all:).
    Anyway, he calls him 'Jumbo', ok, but why is "there's" there? What's the grammar?
     
    Last edited:

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Presumably he's pointing Jumbo out. That guy, over there, Jumbo.

    Edit: If my Google skills are working properly, "Jumbo" is played by Michael Jeter, who is (or at least appears onscreen to be) a rather small man. It is common in the US to insult someone by calling them the opposite of their obvious characteristic: calling a fat man "Skinny," or a short man "Stretch," or an old man "Youngster."
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It's a common way of referring (generally dismissively or scornfully) to someone in the course of a casual conversation.

    "Your friend there seems to think we're all idiots." (Talking to one person, and indicating another.)
    "That man there looks a lot like my old English teacher."
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's the possessive. Jumbo's tongue. Jumbo the elephant's tongue. Jumbo there's tongue. I wouldn't say it's correct, exactly, but it often happens in speech.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    There's is a combination of there (over there) and the possessive 's.

    The literal meaning (which does not sound at all natural;)) is "Remind me to rip out the tongue of Jumbo over there", 'there' being simply a way of underlining/emphasising that you do mean Jumbo (think of someone calling out : "Oy, you there!". It's a similar use of 'there'). If they had simply said "...rip out Jumb's tongue", the meaning would have been the same.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Not necessarily "dismissively or scornfully"; I can easily imagine the following:

    Now, ladies and gentlemen, Professor Smith here has said that the universe is finite, Doctor Jones there says the opposite. I open the matter for discussion. This is simply a gesture towards the fact that the professor is closer to the chairman than the Doctor is. Adding the possessive 's is less standard, however.

    Jumbo - Jumbo's tongue
    Jumbo there - Jumbo there's tongue. As if Jumbo-there were his name.
     
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