Rising tide of a radical takeover

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Obolensky

Senior Member
swedish - Sweden
Is the phrase the rising tide of a radical takeover plausible in the statement below?
An individual is risking his own life if his attitudes are challenging the rising tide of a radical takeover within his society.
 
  • It's a little 'purple,' but it's plausible; OK, if that's your [or whoever's] way of writing.

    ADDED: I am referring to the latter part of the sentence, including the phrase that was the focus of the OP's question.

    "Purple prose," yes, that's what I meant: [a little] overblown, inflated, rhetorically enhanced as opposed to austere, economical, concise. My opinion.
     
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    Obolensky

    Senior Member
    swedish - Sweden
    What do you mean by 'purple'? Where I live it just indicate a color; do you mean purple prose? If so, do you mean the entire [original] statement or a word/phrase in it?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I see this as problematic.

    I am not at all sure what the metaphor of a rising tide of a radical takeover is supposed to mean.

    To me a rising tide suggests a steady movement, but a takeover sounds like something that happens quite quickly. And ...... what part of it all is being defined as radical?

    We could do with more context, what exactly are you talking about. But as it stands it seems flawed to me.
     

    Obolensky

    Senior Member
    swedish - Sweden
    I'm analyzing the novels Things Fall Apart (Achebe) and The Lord of the Flies (Golding) and "civilization vs. savagery; the loss of innocence; innate human evil; the boys/Okonkwo marooned on the island/the village struggle with the conflicting human instincts that exist within each of them—the instinct to work toward civilization and order and the instinct to descend into savagery, violence, and chaos." (SparkNote Editors)
     
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