risks both the derision of those he aspires to

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Oros

Senior Member
Korean
Perhaps by aping the language of the Left Bank salons, Mr Sarkozy risks both the derision of those he aspires to and the contempt of those he leaves behind.

In the above Mr Sarkozy risks 2 things. I don't understand it.

Generally you aspire to achieve something.
You work towards achieving some important task/thing; I aspire to become a billionaire.

I am used to write the noun derision when something is silly. Here it is awkward to my knowledge of English.

Could you tell me the meaning of those things?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-14343878
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    Perhaps by aping the language of the Left Bank salons, Mr Sarkozy risks both the derision of those he aspires to and the contempt of those he leaves behind.

    In the above Mr Sarkozy risks 2 things. I don't understand it.

    Generally you aspire to achieve something.
    You work towards achieving some important task/thing; I aspire to become a billionaire.

    I am used to write the noun derision when something is silly. Here it is awkward to my knowledge of English.

    Could you tell me the meaning of those things?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-14343878
    I think an American writer would not have put it that way, but the meaning is that Sarkozy, by using the terms and vocabulary of the Left Bank salons risks being made fun of (derision) of those he aspires to imitate and the contempt of those from whose ranks he thinks he is moving.
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks MuttQuad for the reply.

    However, I can't understand the following:
    ... the contempt of those from whose ranks he thinks he is moving.

    For me contempt means lack of respect for something.

    Because it is usually contempt for something.

    In law it is contempt of court.
     
    Last edited:

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Sarkozy wants to rise in social class: to leave one group of people behind, and to join another.

    The higher group that he wants to join is "those he aspires to."

    By aping (imitating) this language, he will not impress either of these groups. One will feel derision. The other will feel contempt. These are similar emotions, though there are nuanced differences. The BBC probably used two different words for reasons of style, not because there is a real difference in the way the people in these two groups will feel about him or because those nuances were important to the writer.
     
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