Ristorante , trattoria, locanda , osteria..

As you probably already know.., in Italy food is taken very seriously..! :D
Could you please help me ''with this matter ''.., in your own language , and correct if i'm wrong.., while my english is a bit rusty..:rolleyes:


ristorante = restaurant "an eating-house, establishment where meals may be bought and eaten," 1821, from French restaurant "a restaurant," originally "food that restores," noun use of present participle of restaurer "to restore or refresh," from Old French restorer.

trattoria = tavern ? , trattore ovvero il ristoratore che accoglieva i clienti, restaurateur who welcomed customers, trattoria makes the best of local favorites )

osteria = auberge , hostelry ? derives from hostelry , hosterie (Fr.) oste +‎ -eria, from Old French oste (“innkeeper, host”).
The Osteria was, in the past, an inn where you could find accommodation for the night and there was some wine and food

locanda = hostelry , inn, rest , modesto locale che offre l'opportunità dei pasti e dell'alloggio, modest room , pub that offers the opportunity of meals and accommodation.

bistrot (bar-tabac) = bistro ,"little wineshop or restaurant," the bistros were small places, where to drink and enjoy a plate ''fast''.
 
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  • merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    I guess you really do have to be from a food culture to distinguish all of these perfectly and properly.

    Ristorante- restaurant
    Trattoria- eatery, trattore - caterer
    Osteria- inn
    Locanda- roadhouse
    Bistrot- joint, pub, bistro

    I don't see much of a difference between bistrots and trattorie... both could be small restaurants, fast eateries.
    I guess they both have a full bar. I'm sure confusing terms would be a big faux pas for an Italian.
    We can often use the Italian terms for a bit of cachet.
     
    Greek:

    Ristorante: «Εστιατόριο» [e̞s̠ti.aˈto̞ɾi.o̞] (neut.) < Classical neuter noun «ἑστιατόριον» hĕstĭătórĭŏn --> banqueting-hall of the meats sacrificed to the goddess-protectress of the household, «Ἑστίᾱ» Hĕstíā (Vesta in the Roman pantheon). «Ἑστίᾱ» is of unknown etymoloɡy, could be related to the v. «ἵστημι», hístēmĭ (to stand, set), could be of Pre-Greek oriɡin.

    Trattoria: If it's an Italian restaurant, then we leave it untranslated, just transliterated to «Τρατορία» [trato̞ˈɾi.a] (fem.). In general, it's «ταβέρνα» [taˈve̞rna] (fem.) < Italian taverna.

    Osteria: «Χάνι» [ˈxani] (neut.), or «πανδοχείο» [panðo̞ˈci.o̞] (for its etymoloɡy see below). «Χάνι» < Ottoman Turkish خان (han), inn, caravanserai < Persian خان (idem).

    Locanda: «Πανδοχείο» [panðo̞ˈçi.o̞] (neut.) < Koine neuter noun «πανδοχεῖον» păndŏkʰeîŏn --> inn, hostelry < Classical neuter noun «πανδοκεῖον» păndŏkeîŏn (idem), a compound: Classical neut. adj. «πᾶν» pân --> every, each, of adj. «πᾶς» pâs + neuter deverbative noun «δοκεῖον/δοχεῖον» dŏkeîŏn and dŏkʰeîŏn --> container, receiver, o-ɡrade of Classical deponent v. «δέχομαι» dékʰŏmai.
    Πανδοκ/χεῖον is the place where everyone is accepted and can stay for a few niɡhts. The name has been borrowed in Arabic as فندق (funduq), inn, hotel.

    Bistrot: Nowadays, it's either left untranslated and transliterated as «μπιστρό» [biˈs̠tro̞] (neut. indecl.), or rendered as «αίθουσα*-μπαρ» [ˈeθus̠a ˈbaɾ] (fem.) --> hall-bar. The couple of attempts to translate it haven't cauɡht on:
    (A) «Μικροεστιατόριο» [mikro̞.e̞s̠tiaˈto̞ɾi.o̞] (neut.) --> micro-restaurant, a compound: oblique «μικρο-» [mi.kro̞] as first member in compounds --> small, little < Classical first member in compounds «μῑκρο-» mīkrŏ- of adj. «μῑκρός» mīkrós + «εστιατόριο» (see ristorante).
    (B) «Ποτοπωλείο» [po̞to̞po̞ˈli.o̞] (neut.) --> drink-shop, a compound: oblique «ποτο-» [po̞to̞] as first member in compounds < Classical neut. noun «ποτόν» pŏtón --> that which one drinks, drink (esp. of wine), o-ɡrade deverbative from the v. «πίνω» pī́nō --> to drink + v. «πωλέω/πωλῶ» pōléō (uncontracted)/pōlô (contracted) --> to sell.

    The earlier «καπηλειό» [kapiˈʎo̞] (neut.) used some 60-80 years aɡo, is obsolete < Byz.Gr. neuter noun «καπηλεῖον» kapēleîon --> inn, joint that sells wine < Classical masc./fem. noun «κάπηλος» kắpēlŏs --> innkeeper, retail dealer.

    *MoGr «αίθουσα» [ˈe̞θus̠a] (fem.) --> room, classroom, chamber, hall, auditorium < Classical deverbative fem. noun «αἴθουσα» aítʰousă --> the colonnade or covered ambulatory often leading to the entrance of a building where they used to keep a hearth fire alive < Classical v. «αἴθω» aítʰō --> to kindle, liɡht.
     
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    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao
    trattore ovvero il ristoratore :cross:
    even if, one of the trattore entry in the dictionary stands for ristoratore, everyone in Italy would undersatand trattore as the truck.
    In this case we would say "owner"
    Il titolare/proprietario di XXX è molto gentile>XXX owner is very kind.

    bistrot (bar-tabac)
    Bistrot (not an Italian tipical place) is not a bar/tabacchi. The latter is normal bar (food/coffe/drink) with tabac sell too. It usually opens early in the morning: at dawn or before.

    You forgot the pub. A British/Irish style place for sandwiches, finger food and beers.

    in Italy food is taken very seriously..! :D
    The list would be longer :D


    to distinguish all of these perfectly and properly.
    You are right. The difference is often only in the sign. Sometimes it sounds "cool" to name a dive as osteria or even hostaria (with a Latin sound). It's still a dive.
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    ristorante = restaurant (The word restaurant existed already in Old Catalan, meaning a restorative meal. But as the name for a place, it is a 19th-century loanword from French)

    trattoria = bar

    osteria = hostal, posada, alberg

    locanda = fonda, dispesa, casa d'hostes

    bistrot = taverna

    That'd be to try and find something 'close'. In real life, one just may see trattoria and bistrot and associate it with Italian and French places.

    Other names used here are for those restaurants more specialized on one type of food, whether seafood, roasted meat, rice etc: marisqueria, braseria, rostidoria, arrosseria...

    Then you have the lowest ones, a cantina or guingueta... which are just places with some drinks and light meals next to stations, barracks, beaches...

    While a masia is just a masia (that is, the typical Catalan country house), often you would see some old masias restored as restaurants, usually with traditional Catalan cuisine. It's far from being similar, but it could go in the same sense as a trattoria sometimes.
     
    We have something quiete similar in Italy (in the name, at least).
    The masseria in the South and the maso in (South)Tirol.
    Here it's called «κτήμα» [ˈktima] (neut.), lit. possession < Classical neuter noun «κτῆμα» ktêmă (idem), a deverbative from the deponent v. «κτάομαι/κτῶμαι» ktắŏmai (uncontracted)/ktômai (contracted) --> to acquire, possess (PIE *tkeh₁- to rule, ɡain, acquire cf. Skt. क्षयति (kṣayati), to rule, possess, Av. xšaiieiti, to rule, order).
    They're rented by the high-society for extravagant weddings, the most famous being the one just outside Athens:
    ktima.jpg
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, apart from restaurant, auberge, bistrot, taverne, which have already been mentioned in their more or less derived form, there's another name that is typically French to my knowing (feel free to contradict me), that is brasserie.

    Originally the place where beer is being brewed, a brasserie is a restaurant where you can eat standardized dishes at almost any hour, and have a drink. Some brasseries have become quite upper level in Paris, like L'Alsace, Chez Jenny, La Lorraine or Mollard, but not reaching the level of the finest restaurants, in term of service, comfort, and food sophistication. Usually, they can be found near the most popular locations, railway stations, commercial areas, subway hubs, etc.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Would there be any difference between Parisian bistrots and brasseries?
    Well bistrot is just another name for café, so it's usually smaller, and rather a place to drink than a place to eat, since the choice of dishes is limited, whereas the menu in brasseries often extends on several pages ;)
    But I agree both include classical dishes like steak-frites and croque-monsieur.

    Moreover, one of the supposed origin of the word bistrot is Russian быстро, which means fast, so bistrots are usually places where you eat fast, because of the simplicity of dishes, the limited comfort, etc. On the opposite, brasseries are comfortable enough to take all time to have a meal à la française :p

    bistrot0380.jpg

    A Parisian bistrot
    500266-formule-dejeuner-du-bistrot-instinct.jpg

    Menu of a bistrot

    660.jpg

    A Parisian brasserie
    4612-photomenu.png

    Menu of a brasserie

    Also, as you can see, prices are not on the same level in a bistrot and in a brasserie.
     
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    Ciao

    even if, one of the trattore entry in the dictionary stands for ristoratore, everyone in Italy would undersatand trattore as the truck.
    In this case we would say "owner"
    Il titolare/proprietario di XXX è molto gentile>XXX owner is very kind.

    bistrot (bar-tabac)
    Bistrot (not an Italian tipical place) is not a bar/tabacchi. The latter is normal bar (food/coffe/drink) with tabac sell too. It usually opens early in the morning: at dawn or before.

    You forgot the pub. A British/Irish style place for sandwiches, finger food and beers.


    The list would be longer :D



    You are right. The difference is often only in the sign. Sometimes it sounds "cool" to name a dive as osteria or even hostaria (with a Latin sound). It's still a dive.

    That's right ristoratore is more common nowadays .., but there is also trattore .., I know it souds a little bit funny like a tractor .. :D
    trattore² s. m. [dal fr. traiteur, der. di traiter "trattare"] [chi gestisce una trattoria] ≈ oste. ‖ bettoliere, locandiere, ristoratore, taverniere.

    béttola – Osteria d’infimo ordine con spaccio e mescita di vino e talora con servizio di cucina; quasi sempre spreg.
    béttola = a low quality auberge , hostelry.
     
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    I guess you really do have to be from a food culture to distinguish all of these perfectly and properly.

    Ristorante- restaurant
    Trattoria- eatery, trattore - caterer
    Osteria- inn
    Locanda- roadhouse
    Bistrot- joint, pub, bistro

    I don't see much of a difference between bistrots and trattorie... both could be small restaurants, fast eateries.
    I guess they both have a full bar. I'm sure confusing terms would be a big faux pas for an Italian.
    We can often use the Italian terms for a bit of cachet.

    I'm only half Italian..(I've been living here since 1995).., but belive me I learnt a lot of things '' in the meantime ''..
    Italian culture traces its roots back to the ancient world and has influenced art, fashion and food around the world..
    No one area of Italy eats the same things as the next.., and each region has its own spin on "Italian food"..;)
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    I'm only half Italian..(I've been living here since 1995).., but belive me I learnt a lot of things '' in the meantime ''..
    Italian culture traces its roots back to the ancient world and has influenced art, fashion and food around the world..
    No one area of Italy eats the same things as the next.., and each region has its own spin on "Italian food"..;)
    Yes, I know that Italians take their cuisine very seriously. I don't doubt there is an important difference between bettola and trattoria, but it escapes me.
    I've learned to keep quiet around Italians. They are easy to offend culinarily.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    8 euros for an oeuf mayonnaise? :eek:
    Yes these are the prices in Paris. Do you find this expensive? In Lorraine, as almost everywhere other than Paris, prices must be somewhat lower.

    Note that 8€ is the price for the first course they call "Oeuf Parfait", which is more than an oeuf mayonnaise: it's also comprised of lentils soup and Bayonne ham.
     
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    Catalan:

    ristorante = restaurant (The word restaurant existed already in Old Catalan, meaning a restorative meal. But as the name for a place, it is a 19th-century loanword from French)

    trattoria = bar

    osteria = hostal, posada, alberg

    locanda = fonda, dispesa, casa d'hostes

    bistrot = taverna

    That'd be to try and find something 'close'. In real life, one just may see trattoria and bistrot and associate it with Italian and French places.

    Other names used here are for those restaurants more specialized on one type of food, whether seafood, roasted meat, rice etc: marisqueria, braseria, rostidoria, arrosseria...

    Then you have the lowest ones, a cantina or guingueta... which are just places with some drinks and light meals next to stations, barracks, beaches...

    While a masia is just a masia (that is, the typical Catalan country house), often you would see some old masias restored as restaurants, usually with traditional Catalan cuisine. It's far from being similar, but it could go in the same sense as a trattoria sometimes.
    Thanks !

    Let's see the similarities between Catalan and Italian!? ;)

    hostal = ostello , (hotel) pensione ( hostel , inn ? )

    Pensione completa, mezza pensione o B&B ..,= full board , half-board , etc

    posada = locanda , taverna ?

    dispesa = dispensa , bottega ( a food storage ? ) Luogo nel quale si dispensano viveri; region., spaccio, bottega per la vendita di determinati generi alimentari: Bottega for the sale of certain foodstuffs.

    La bottega della pizza = pizzeria

    casa d'hostes = casa degli ospiti ? It doesn't exist in Italian !?

    rosticeria = la rosticceria è un esercizio commerciale pubblico dove è possibile acquistare e consumare in loco cibi caldi, soprattutto arrosti (da cui il nome) oppure acquistarle per l'asporto.
    The Rosticceria is a public commercial exercise where you can buy and consume hot foods on site, especially roast (from which the name) or buy them for takeaway.
    1643213552518.png



    cantina = cantina (ristorante) or winery !
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Those Parisian brasseries look swanky, almost like those fine restaurants called bouillons.
    Yes, they try to be swanky (the Paris cachet :rolleyes:) but often the service is not very high level, waiters are overloaded because all people go eating at the same time, for example after a theatre play, they are noisy, etc.
    If you want smart service and creative cuisine, you have to go to a true restaurant, and in that case of course, prices are even higher.

    Bouillons are popular restaurants, and are even cheaper and simpler than brasseries. They serve traditional and popular French cuisine, in a very casual setting. Their name comes from their very simple main dish, le bouillon (broth).
     
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    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Yes these are the prices in Paris. Do you find this expensive? In Lorraine, as everywhere other than Paris, prices must be somewhat lower.

    Note that 8€ is the price for the first course they call "Oeuf Parfait", which is more than an oeuf mayonnaise: it's also comprised of lentils soup and Bayonne ham.
    I wouldn't pay that price. I'd think of all the food I could buy at the grocery and prepare at home for the same price. Mind you I'm not really a cook. I can make croque-monsieur and oeuf mayonnaise though! I'd only go to a brasserie to eat something I'd not have at home.
    In Paris cafés (coffee houses) I wouldn't order a soda either. 4 euros for a coke when you can buy a 2 quart bottle at the grocery for less is asinine.
     
    Greek:

    Ristorante: «Εστιατόριο» [e̞s̠ti.aˈto̞ɾi.o̞] (neut.) < Classical neuter noun «ἑστιατόριον» hĕstĭătórĭŏn --> banqueting-hall of the meats sacrificed to the goddess-protectress of the household, «Ἑστίᾱ» Hĕstíā (Vesta in the Roman pantheon). «Ἑστίᾱ» is of unknown etymoloɡy, could be related to the v. «ἵστημι», hístēmĭ (to stand, set), could be of Pre-Greek oriɡin.

    Trattoria: If it's an Italian restaurant, then we leave it untranslated, just transliterated to «Τρατορία» [trato̞ˈɾi.a] (fem.). In general, it's «ταβέρνα» [taˈve̞rna] (fem.) < Italian taverna.

    Osteria: «Χάνι» [ˈxani] (neut.), or «πανδοχείο» [panðo̞ˈci.o̞] (for its etymoloɡy see below). «Χάνι» < Ottoman Turkish خان (han), inn, caravanserai < Persian خان (idem).

    Locanda: «Πανδοχείο» [panðo̞ˈçi.o̞] (neut.) < Koine neuter noun «πανδοχεῖον» păndŏkʰeîŏn --> inn, hostelry < Classical neuter noun «πανδοκεῖον» păndŏkeîŏn (idem), a compound: Classical neut. adj. «πᾶν» pân --> every, each, of adj. «πᾶς» pâs + neuter deverbative noun «δοκεῖον/δοχεῖον» dŏkeîŏn and dŏkʰeîŏn --> container, receiver, o-ɡrade of Classical deponent v. «δέχομαι» dékʰŏmai.
    Πανδοκ/χεῖον is the place where everyone is accepted and can stay for a few niɡhts. The name has been borrowed in Arabic as فندق (funduq), inn, hotel.

    Bistrot: Nowadays, it's either left untranslated and transliterated as «μπιστρό» [biˈs̠tro̞] (neut. indecl.), or rendered as «αίθουσα*-μπαρ» [ˈeθus̠a ˈbaɾ] (fem.) --> hall-bar. The couple of attempts to translate it haven't cauɡht on:
    (A) «Μικροεστιατόριο» [mikro̞.e̞s̠tiaˈto̞ɾi.o̞] (neut.) --> micro-restaurant, a compound: oblique «μικρο-» [mi.kro̞] as first member in compounds --> small, little < Classical first member in compounds «μῑκρο-» mīkrŏ- of adj. «μῑκρός» mīkrós + «εστιατόριο» (see ristorante).
    (B) «Ποτοπωλείο» [po̞to̞po̞ˈli.o̞] (neut.) --> drink-shop, a compound: oblique «ποτο-» [po̞to̞] as first member in compounds < Classical neut. noun «ποτόν» pŏtón --> that which one drinks, drink (esp. of wine), o-ɡrade deverbative from the v. «πίνω» pī́nō --> to drink + v. «πωλέω/πωλῶ» pōléō (uncontracted)/pōlô (contracted) --> to sell.

    The earlier «καπηλειό» [kapiˈʎo̞] (neut.) used some 60-80 years aɡo, is obsolete < Byz.Gr. neuter noun «καπηλεῖον» kapēleîon --> inn, joint that sells wine < Classical masc./fem. noun «κάπηλος» kắpēlŏs --> innkeeper, retail dealer.

    *MoGr «αίθουσα» [ˈe̞θus̠a] (fem.) --> room, classroom, chamber, hall, auditorium < Classical deverbative fem. noun «αἴθουσα» aítʰousă --> the colonnade or covered ambulatory often leading to the entrance of a building where they used to keep a hearth fire alive < Classical v. «αἴθω» aítʰō --> to kindle, liɡht.
    Thanks !

    I've also discovered bottéga s. f. [Latin. apothēca, from Greek. ἀποϑήκη «ripostiglio, magazzino»] = storage room , warehouse , store ?

    La bottéga della pizza = pizzeria
     
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    In French, apart from restaurant, auberge, bistrot, taverne, which have already been mentioned in their more or less derived form, there's another name that is typically French to my knowing (feel free to contradict me), that is brasserie.

    Originally the place where beer is being brewed, a brasserie is a restaurant where you can eat standardized dishes at almost any hour, and have a drink. Some brasseries have become quite upper level in Paris, like L'Alsace, Chez Jenny, La Lorraine or Mollard, but not reaching the level of the finest restaurants, in term of service, comfort, and food sophistication. Usually, they can be found near the most popular locations, railway stations, commercial areas, subway hubs, etc.
    Thanks !

    Would you tell me something about table d’hôte and café-brasserie.?
    The term brasserie draws on the verb brasser, which refers to the process of brewing beer.?
     

    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    You'll never find bettola on a sign. They can call bettola your place. It's a derogatory word.

    They are easy to offend culinarily.
    not really! :D

    in Italian standard it's a piece of forniture you can find in your kitchen (or a small room) where you can store food.

    La bottéga della pizza = pizzeria
    It could be a brand. It means nothing (even though understandable). On the food, bottega is a small store while on the non food, bottega is the artisan "kingdom".
    (in the signs, after bottega you can find several other foods such as :cappelletto, caffè, panzerotto, pasta fresca..... or job/related such as: sarto, parrucca, capello, cappello, marmitta....)

    German Apotheke
    Is it the pharmacy?

    I'll add pizzeria (from very cheap to luxury places)
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    dispesa = dispensa , bottega ( a food storage ? )
    Not really. Dispesa doesn't really have to do with the Spanish despensa (In Catalan we call that rebost). It is a variant of despesa, which means expense, expenditure, and comes from casa de dispesa, a guesthouse in which hosts would eat and sleep at a fixed price, close to the Spanish pensión.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Then you have the lowest ones, a cantina or guingueta... which are just places with some drinks and light meals next to stations, barracks, beaches...
    guingueta obviously comes from French guinguette [ɡɛ̃.ɡɛt] which has the same meaning. The origin of the word is not clear, but might come from the name of a vineyard, le clos Guinguet, where the first guinguettes produced their wine from. It was found on the hill of Ménilmontant, which is nowadays inside Paris, but at that time (19th century) was still quite a rural area.
     
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    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Would you tell me something about table d’hôte and café-brasserie.?
    café-brasserie is just an establishment which both works like a café outside meal hours (in the morning and in the afternoon, serving hot and fresh drinks), and like a brasserie during meal hours.

    table d'hôte is different. It's the food service of a chambre d'hôte, which itself consists in renting a sleeping room in a private home. You share the common home spaces with the inhabitants. Additionally, they sometimes provide a food service to their clients in the common dining room, for instance. This is called table d'hôte.
     
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    ...
    rosticeria = la rosticceria è un esercizio commerciale pubblico dove è possibile acquistare e consumare in loco cibi caldi, soprattutto arrosti (da cui il nome) oppure acquistarle per l'asporto.
    The Rosticceria is a public commercial exercise where you can buy and consume hot foods on site, especially roast (from which the name) or buy them for takeaway.
    View attachment 66868
    We have that too as «Ψητοπωλείο» [p͡s̠ito̞po̞ˈli.o̞] (neut.) --> lit. ɡrill-sellinɡ-house, a compound: MoGr neuter noun «ψητό» [p͡s̠iˈto̞] --> anythinɡ ɡrilled, roasted, barbequed, especially of meats, a nominalized adjective: «ψητός, -τή, -τό» [p͡s̠iˈto̞s̠] (masc.), [p͡s̠iˈti] (fem.), [p͡s̠iˈto̞] (neut.) --> grilled, roasted < Byz.Gr v. «ψήνω» psḗnō --> to roast, ɡrill < Classical adj. «ἕψω» hépsō --> to boil, seethe, later, to dry food; the Byzantine & MoGr «ψήνω» is the product of reanalysis of the Aorist II «ἔψηνον» épsēnŏn + v. «πωλέω/πωλῶ» pōléō (uncontracted)/pōlô (contracted) --> to sell:
    psitopolio.jpg


    Is it the pharmacy?
    Yes it is.
    ...

    cantina = cantina (ristorante) or winery !
    To us «καντίνα» [kanˈdina] (fem.) < Ιt. cantina, is the temporary food service facility, usually on wheels:
    kantina.jpg
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Bouillons are popular restaurants, and are even cheaper and simpler than brasseries. They serve traditional and popular French cuisine, in a very casual setting. Their name comes from their very simple main dish, le bouillon (broth).
    The "Bouillons" I know are as upscale and expensive as possible. There is one on the left bank I take visitors looking for that quintessential Oh là là experience.
    But with that name I don't doubt they specialized in soups at the beginning.
     
    So in summary , a small guide for every foodie.. :D

    ristorante = restaurant "an eating-house, establishment where meals may be bought and eaten," 1821, from French restaurant "a restaurant," originally "food that restores," noun use of present participle of restaurer "to restore or refresh," from Old French restorer.

    trattoria = tavern ? , trattore ovvero il ristoratore che accoglieva i clienti, restaurateur who welcomed customers, trattoria makes the best of local favorites )

    taverna = tavern , roadhouse

    osteria = auberge , hostelry ? derives from hostelry , hosterie (Fr.) oste +‎ -eria, from Old French oste (“innkeeper, host”).
    The Osteria was, in the past, an inn where you could find accommodation for the night and there was some wine and food

    locanda = hostelry , inn, rest , modesto locale che offre l'opportunità dei pasti e dell'alloggio, modest room , pub that offers the opportunity of meals and accommodation.

    pizzeria
    pizza al taglio =
    pizza slices :p

    1643645006663.png


    focacceria = from focaccia a flat bread similar to pizza dough that can be either sweet or savory, Liguria is the best known region for focaccia.

    1643645155508.png


    bruschetteria = from bruschetta

    1643644588456.png


    piadineria =
    from piadina , a round flatbread hailing from the Romagna side of Emilia-Romagna.

    1643644169444.png



    birreria = beer garden , pub , brewery.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    If we are in specialties, I want to mention French crêperie, an establishment which serves galettes (salty) and crêpes (sweet), a specialty of Brittany, but you can find them everywhere in France.

    pate-a-crepes-salee-0.jpg

    Galette with ham, cheese and egg.

    1643648418904.png

    Chocolate crêpes

    The difference between galette and crêpe is in the batter (dough): the galette batter is made of buckwheat (sarrasin) flour, and the crêpe batter is made of normal wheat flour.
    The galette is the basis for salty recipes, and the crêpe is the basis for sweet recipes, at least in traditional crêperies.

    Traditionally, with galettes and crêpes, it's customary to drink the alcoholic beverage specialty of Brittany, le cidre (cider) in a terra cotta container called bolée.

    1643649660864.png

    1643649588023.png
     
    Last edited:
    If we are in specialties, I want to mention French crêperie, an establishment which serves galettes (salty) and crêpes (sweet), a specialty of Brittany, but you can find them everywhere in France.

    View attachment 67052
    Galette with ham, cheese and egg.

    View attachment 67051
    Chocolate crêpes

    The difference between galette and crêpe is in the batter (dough): the galette batter is made of buckwheat (sarrazin) flour, and the crêpe batter is made of normal wheat flour.
    The galette is the basis for salty recipes, and the crêpe is the basis for sweet recipes, at least in traditional crêperies.

    Traditionally, with galettes and crêpes, it's customary to drink the alcoholic beverage specialty of Brittany, le cidre (cider) in a terra cotta container called bolée.

    View attachment 67055
    View attachment 67054

    In Italy we have creperìa too ..(cioè locale pubblico specializzato nella produzione e vendita di crêpes) :D

    1643650121590.png
     
    I'll try to do it in Polish.. !? :p


    restauracja = restaurant

    zajazd = inn , hostel
    zajazd przydrożny = roadhaouse

    gospoda = in , tavern

    oberża = auberge

    karczma = inn, tavern
    1643820555020.png


    pierogarnia = pierogi restaurant

    1643821433218.png


    1643820948531.png



    bar mleczny = canteen/restaurant , cheap but good.

    1643821589978.png



    bar salatkowy = salad bar

    1643821299520.png


    naleśnikarnia = crêperie

    1643821911092.png
     
    Last edited:
    As already pointed out before, nobody will say trattore. 99.99999999999% of us would get the truck and a truck can't feed us :D

    Add to the list
    paninoteca
    View attachment 67066
    insalateria

    View attachment 67067

    Ok but trattore exist in Italian language...( even if you don't use it ) ... ! :D

    trattore¹​

    trattore¹ /tra't:eek:re/ s. m. [der. di trarre]. - (aut., agr.) [automezzo per lavori agricoli, provvisto di grandi ruote oppure di cingoli] ≈ trattrice. ... Leggi Tutto

    trattore²​

    trattore² s. m. [dal fr. traiteur, der. di traiter "trattare"] (f., non com., -trice, pop. -tora). - (mest., comm.) [chi gestisce una trattoria] ≈ oste. ‖ bettoliere, locandiere, ristoratore, taverniere. ... Leggi Tutto

    trattore: approfondimenti in "Sinonimi_e_Contrari" - Treccani
     
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