rivers unbestrod in bridges and the like

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From Londonist.com - How The London Boroughs Got Their Names:


Redbridge


"Quite simply, named for a red bridge which bestrode the River Roding from the 17th century, until it was knocked down for road improvement in 1922"

So, if a river happens to be bridgeless or lacking other kinds of 'fordingwork' like stepping stones(?)ziplines(?) - could it then be talked of as an: unbestrod river - all the backrivers over there are unbestrod/ in bridgelife/bridgework?

 
  • Unoverwordinesslogged

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    Thanks. Guess it doesn't matter seeing as unstrod/unbestrod mightn't be wordbook words, but reckon both unbestridden and unbestrod/unstrod(?) work - with the latter inching it on the grounds that strod feels more effective with 'things' whilst stridden moreso with how mankind walks/runs and so forth.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Why try to create a word that nobody will recognise or use when the word 'unbridged' exists?
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

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    Why try to create a word that nobody will recognise or use when the word 'unbridged' exists?
    Didn't know I was creating a word. Didn't know unbridged existed. Didn't know 'unbridged' covers also unsteppingstoned, unziplined, unferried (and so forth) rivers too :)
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

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    Why try to create a word that nobody will recognise or use when the word 'unbridged' exists?
    Enough folk understand the meaning behind: rivers unstrod in bridges - just like how I somehow understood the bestrode in: "Quite simply, named for a red bridge which bestrode the River Roding from the 17th century, until it was knocked down for road improvement in 1922"

     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Thanks. Guess it doesn't matter seeing as unstrod/unbestrod mightn't be wordbook words, but reckon both unbestridden and unbestrod/unstrod(?) work - with the latter inching it on the grounds that strod feels more effective with 'things' whilst stridden moreso with how mankind walks/runs and so forth.
    Bestride is an old word with an archaic feel to it.
    If you must use it, you need to check the forms of the verb that were used - bestrod isn't one of them. The OED indicates the main forms are bestride, bestrode, bestridden.

    To convey the meaning that the back-rivers do not have any crossing points, that's exactly what I would say. Not least because I wouldn't consider that either a ford or stepping stones bestrode a river.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Since bestride can't be applied to stepping stones or ferries and a zip wire is a method of bridging, the non-existent 'unbestride' can't apply to them either - from the OED
    To stand over (a place) with the legs astride; to straddle over, to bestraddle. Also fig.
    Stepping stones don't bestride a river they just help to keep your feet dry.
    Didn't know unbridged existed.
    Well, now you do. There's also 'unforded'.
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

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    Bestride is an old word with an archaic feel to it.
    If you must use it, you need to check the forms of the verb that were used - bestrod isn't one of them. The OED indicates the main forms are bestride, bestrode, bestridden.

    To convey the meaning that the back-rivers do not have any crossing points, that's exactly what I would say. Not least because I wouldn't consider that either a ford or stepping stones bestrode a river.
    Thanks. So all could say rivers unbestrode/unstrode in bridges.

    PS ziplines bestride the span of a river's waters though don't they?
     

    Unoverwordinesslogged

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    Since bestride can't be applied to stepping stones or ferries and a zip wire is a method of bridging, the non-existent 'unbestride' can't apply to them either - from the OED Stepping stones don't bestride a river they just help to keep your feet dry.
    Well, now you do. There's also 'unforded'.
    Thanks for unforded. Still don't get why I can't get unbestrode in bridges from the erstwhile bestrode quote.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks for unforded. Still don't get why I can't get unbestrode in bridges from the erstwhile bestrode quote.
    The adjectival form of the verb is taken from the past participle. The past participle of bestride is (as has been pointed out) bestridden. It would therefore be unbestridden in bridges.

    However, even that is wrong as a bridge bestrides a river and, therefore, a river is bestridden by a bridge.

    "The river is bestridden by a bridge" is the passive form of the verb, and thus it would be unbestridden by bridges.
     
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