Roast, toast, broil and grill

  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    It depends on whether the speaker/writer speaks AE or BE.

    Most often than not, broiling and grilling can be used interchangeably; here, the connotation employed is that grilling takes place on a barbecue grill, outdoors.
     

    daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Broiling is cooking in the oven with direct heat coming from above.
    When grilling the heat is coming from below. Usually done outside on a grill or on some stove tops that have a built in grill.
     

    milan55

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Is there any difference between " to broil " and " to grill ". Which of these two words is more common and in which region ???
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    I've just looked it up and there isn't a difference, it means to cook by direct radiant heat.


    but its taught me something, because I always thought it meant to cook meat in the oven in liquid, so its part baked, part boiled.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The answer is BOTH yes AND no.

    When speakers of AE say "broil", they are referring to cooking by direct radiant heat from ABOVE the item cooked. This is usually done in that part of a kitchen "stove" (called a "cooker" in BE) that speakers of AE would call the "broiler". With older gas stoves, the broiler was a separate compartment below the oven. The oven was heated by gas flames outside and below the oven compartment, while the broiler was directly below these exposed gas flames. In newer stoves, even gas stoves, it is common to have the broiling function performed by a separate electrical element in the top of the oven compartment itself. In either case, though, the heat is coming from above the item being "broiled".

    In BE, this whole process of cooking by direct heat, even if the heat comes from above, seems to be called "grilling".

    Speakers of AE, however, would not use the term "grilling" to mean cooking by direct heat from above. Instead, this term means that one is cooking by direct heat from BELOW the food being cooked. There are two different things meant by "grilling". One is cooking over an open grillwork or gridiron above coals or flames, such as on a barbecue grill. The other type of "grill" is a large flat surface not commonly found in private houses, but common in restaurants.
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    that part of a kitchen "stove" (called a "cooker" in BE)

    An admirably full answer from GreenWhiteBlue. However, as a BE speaker I am a little confused, because I would grill (BE) my chops under the radiant heat of the grill in my stove (AE). I seem to remember calling the latter a cooker a long time ago. Also, we can buy a type of chicken known as a 'broiler'. So AE/BE language borrowing and change can be seen at work.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    In BE, the "grill pan" is a, usually rectangle, metal affair with a handle at the front and removable metal grid which stands inside. Food (sausages, chops etc) is placed atop the metal grid inside the pan, which is placed under direct heat in a separate part of the oven (or "stove - I never use that word), called "the grill". The pan catches grease, fat etc, which drains from the food.

    Put some sausages under the grill, will you?
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    In BE, the "grill pan" is a, usually rectangle, metal affair with a handle at the front and removable metal grid which stands inside. Food (sausages, chops etc) is placed atop the metal grid inside the pan, which is placed under direct heat in a separate part of the oven (or "stove - I never use that word), called "the grill". The pan catches grease, fat etc, which drains from the food.

    Put some sausages under the grill, will you?
    I would agree with your description of a grill pan, but what the site describes is a solid piece of round grooved iron with a wooden handle which you place over the source of heat, in other words, a skillet. Oh, how I miss a good old English mixed grill!!! Can't get the ingredients here, though. :mad:
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    In NZ:

    I don't think I've ever used or heard the word BROIL. We might use BAKE or ROAST instead.

    To grill = to cook something using the grill function in the oven, i.e. placing something under direct heat from above, usually with the rack placed high in order to be close to the heat.

    To BBQ = to cook something on a BBQ.
     

    alevtinka

    Senior Member
    Chinese (Mandarin)
    Is there any difference between "to roast, broil, grill, and toast" (ways of cooking, without water) ?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Yes. They are all very different.

    Something roasted is in a covered pot in an oven. Something broiled is exposed directly to the flame, usually from above. Something grilled is placed on an open grate over a flame or on a pan that has raised "fins" along the bottom. Something toasted is usually exposed to heat directly or indirectly until the surface browns slightly. ("Toasted" has several meanings, depending on the food product.)
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In AE, there would be a difference.

    Roast means to cook something by exposure of all sides of the item to dry heat. One can do this in an oven (which is almost synonymous with baking), or on a spit over a flame, or by surrounding with hot coals.

    To broil in AE means to cook with heat that comes from above. To grill means to cook with heat that comes from below, and very frequently with that heat being flames or coals, and the food being held above it on an open grill of some kind.

    To toast can mean to expose the exterior of something to a flame until it turns brown (such as toasting marshmallows over a fire), but today the most common meaning is to brown the exterior of a breadstuff of some kind by putting it in a toaster.

    EDIT: cross-posted with JamesM.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I never met broiling as a concept until I read American recipes.

    Roasted, in the UK, doesn't necessarily mean the thing covered, it means in the oven, with heat all around it. We are very fond of roast meats as a nation, and roasted vegetables are getting more popular and would generally NOT be covered.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Grill and toast are much the same, to me. We do them UNDER a grill, not as GWB does his. Or in a toaster if it bread of some sort.

    I thin'k the variation on whether we say grill or toast depends on the foodstuff. Meat and fish etc are grilled, bread, tea-cakes etc are toasted.

    What American call grilling sounds more like barbequing to me, on a grid directly over heat.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    We do them UNDER a grill
    Can you explain that part? What does the part called "grill" look like?

    As for roasting, I may be was wrong there. I was probably thinking of a pot roast, the most common roast for me. Roast beef would be exposed to the heat on all sides, and roast pig, as GWB said, is buried in coals. A roast turkey is exposed on all sides, too. There's a pan below to catch the drippings.

    As for toasting, I was thinking of toasted almonds as one use of the term, which are actually toasted in a pan on top of the range/cooker.
     
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    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    What American call grilling sounds more like barbequing to me, on a grid directly over heat.
    The term "barbecue" has a variety of different regioinal meanings in the US. In some places, it does indeed mean to cook on a grill over flames, but in others it refers to a slow-roasting process, which often includes smoking, and which is most commonly done to pork of some kind. In those places, a steak cooked on a grill over coals would not be called "barbecue", nor would the cooking method be called "barbecuing".

    Note that "grilling" can also involve cooking on a flat metal device very common in restaurants, and the cooking process -- and the food that results -- are not at all similar to using an open grill over flames. This is a picture of food being cooked on the type of "grill" common in restaurants:
    http://www.rachelleb.com/images/2011/01/diner_grill_grill.jpg
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Last edited:

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I never met broiling as a concept until I read American recipes.
    Older American kitchen stoves or ranges (we don't call them "cookers") that were fueled by gas would typically heat the oven by having a gas burner underneath the metal box of the oven. This part of the stove could be accessed by another door, and food could be placed under the flame. This placement allowed fat to drip from the meat as it was cooking without falling into a flame, causing a fire.
    In this picture, the oven is the door with the window, while the broiler (which is probably a pull-out drawer) is the compartment under it with a similar handle:
    http://www.michaelmurray.ca/blog/stove.jpg

    Over time stoves have changed, and even gas stoves tend to have electrical broiling elements, which are often placed in the top of the oven and which are heated separately from those electrical elements that heat the oven. Still, the idea of heat that is coming only from above is the defining quality of broiling something. In this picture:
    http://www.cookthink.com/images/Article/911/267955837_c9184239b9.jpg
    the eggs have been sprinkled with grated cheese, and the whole pan has been placed under the broiler (see the glowing red element?) in order to melt and brown the cheese quickly without cooking the eggs too much more.
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    The type of grilling mentioned using a falt metal griddle thing has become increasingly popular in the UK too, I believe.
     
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