Rojcewicz

  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi mimi,

    Welcome to the Forums! I've moved your thread to the "Slavic Languages" forum so people who have a better understanding of this type of pronunciation would be able to help.

    There are probably several variations of pronunciation, based upon individual languages.

    My guess, based on first site, is that it is pronounced (to an American ear) as: roche-uh-vitz (or something fairly close).
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    It's a Polish name pronounced roy-tse-vich with the stress on the first syllable.
    I thought the stress in Polish always lies on the penultimate syllable? Well, there may be some exceptions, I suppose...
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    I thought the stress in Polish always lies on the penultimate syllable? Well, there may be some exceptions, I suppose...
    That's correct. No exception here. Exceptions exist only for some grammatical forms (e.g. chcielibyśmy - chcieli -by - śmy) and not too often for foreign names.

    It's Rojcewicz (roy-tse-vich)
     

    Brian P

    Senior Member
    My Polish too is very rusty, Anatoli, but I seem to recall that feminine nouns ending in "a" change to ą in the accusative so I think that Masz racją (literally, "you have the right")is correct. Polaki gdzie jestscie?
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    My Polish too is very rusty, Anatoli, but I seem to recall that feminine nouns ending in "a" change to ą in the accusative so I think that Masz racją (literally, "you have the right")is correct. Polaki gdzie jestscie?
    Masz racię (accusative)
    Polacy, gdzie jestcie?
     
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