roll it up vs. roll out

gilespy

Senior Member
Serbian
Hi all,

I was watching some crime investigation documentary, where the host said for the criminal how "she did not have a plan to role it up", thinking that she did not have a plan on how to safely get out.

Instead of "role it up", could one use roll out? The "role it up" phrase sounds somehow awkward, and for sure not intuitive. :)
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I'm sure the phrase was "roll it up", since "role it up" wouldn't make any sense. But without any context, it's impossible to guess how the phrase was used or to answer your question.

    What was the name of the show? (If the transcript is online, please provide a link.) Where was the woman? Safely get out of what? Roll what up? What do you mean by the "host"?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I am mystified. As far as I know, there is no verb "to role" or "role up" in common use. I suspect this is a misspelling for "roll".

    There is an intransitive verb "to roll up" = To arrive (in a casual manner) e.g. "The party started at 8 o'clock but John did not roll up until 10." also used at circuses and other show-business events in the imperative: "Roll up! Roll up! See the show of a lifetime!" But this does not work in your example as your verb is transitive and has the object "it".

    "To roll out" = To distribute something for sale. (Figurative from "roll out of the factory.") "The new iPhone 6 will be rolled out in September." So I don't think that will work either.
     

    gilespy

    Senior Member
    Serbian
    Yes, I meant roll, not role. Typo.

    @Parla, I don't know the name of the show unfortunately. By host I mean the moderator of the show. The criminal was deeply involved in a crime and she did not have a plan to "roll it up", i.e. the plan how to get out when the things become hot.
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    What does ''roll it up'' mean here in this context from the series Prison Break when some prisoners are in a chapel listening to a priest? After he (the priest) finishes, the prisoners stand up to leave. When a prisoner sees his brother back there in the chapel stalls to talk to him which the officer yells at him: Burrows, roll it up. Happy hour's over.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Burrows, roll it up. = Burrows, finish what you are doing.

    This a figurative meaning, probably from the idea of rolling up a scroll, a plan, a drawing, a carpet, etc., when you have finished looking at it/using it.
     
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