Romance languages: cognates with different genders

  • padredeocho

    Banned
    United States
    Hi all,

    I'm wondering if anyone can give me some examples of words that are cognates between two or more of these four Romance languages, but for which the gender is different in at least one. (Just as an example of one of the many possible combinations: a word that exists as a cognate in Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian, yet is masculine in Spanish and Portuguese but feminine in Italian...)

    Any examples greatly appreciated... thanks!
    cion suffix universally female, but not ion like avion y camion
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Romanian:

    o echipă (f.)
    un râs (n.)
    un surâs (n.)

    In Romanian we don't have the cognate "pavor/paura" instead we use "teamă" (Lat. timere) and "frică" (Ngr. phrikē).

    Hope this helped!

    :) robbie
     

    spielenschach

    Senior Member
    Portugal . Portuguese
    Uf, there are lots. For instance most words that end in "-eur" in French are feminine, and end in "-or" in Spanish and are masculine: Erreur (f) - Error (m); Valeur (f) - Valor (m);....
    RENARD m. - raposa f.
    oie f. - ganso m.
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    Oops, I forgot to add. My rule does not apply to derivative words. "farceur" comes from "farce" and it's masculine,....
    I am not sure that that rule would work either.

    But "eur" words that describe persons or objects are masculine.
     

    DrLindenbrock

    Senior Member
    Italian
    So letters are masculine in Portuguese and French, and feminine in Spanish and Italian...

    Anyone know about the gender of the letters in Latin or its other descendants?
    My Latin dictionary says A, B and C can be either feminin or neuter... I presume this is valid for all letters.... I'll check later, if you really want me to ;)
     

    olivinha

    Senior Member
    Português, Brasil
    So letters are masculine in Portuguese and French, and feminine in Spanish and Italian...
    Regarding Portuguese, yes, letters are masculine but the word letter, itself, is feminine.
    So it is:
    "o A" (preceded by masculine article), but
    "a letra A" (the letter A, preceded by feminine article).

    O
     

    albondiga

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    My Latin dictionary says A, B and C can be either feminin or neuter... I presume this is valid for all letters.... I'll check later, if you really want me to ;)
    Why would some of the letters have different genders than the rest? Latin grammar isn't that unpredictable, is it? :D
     

    albondiga

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    Just encountered an interesting one: tigre is shown in the dictionaries as masculine in Spanish, Portuguese, and French, but feminine in Italian (checked three different dictionaries, including a spagnolo-italiano one :) )...

    I would think that it could probably be used either way in all four depending on the sex of the animal, but it's interesting that the default gender on this one differs from the others in Italian... I'm wondering why...
     

    J.F. de TROYES

    Senior Member
    francais-France
    Generally speaking "tigre " in French is masculine as far as the species is concerned, for the female there is a feminine "la tigresse". It's the same for "le lion", "la lionne".
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    More:

    pt o vale (m), es el valle (m), ca la vall (f), fr la vallée (f), it la valle (f), ro vale (f)
    pt a cor (f), es el color (m), ca el color (m), fr la couleur (f), it il colore (m), ro culoare (f)
    pt o chocolate (m), es el chocolate (m), ca la xocolata (f), fr le chocolat (m), it il cioccolato (m), ro ciocolată (f)
    pt a bactéria (f), es la bacteria (f), ca el bacteri (m), fr la bactérie (f), it il batterio (m), ro bacterie (f)
    pt a ordem (f), es el orden (m), ca l'ordre (m), fr l'ordre (m), it l'ordine (m), ro ordine (f); ("arrangement")
    pt a ordem (f), es la orden (f), ca l'ordre (f), fr l'ordre (m), it l'ordine (m), ro ordin (n); ("command")
    pt o calor (m), es el calor (m), ca la calor (f), fr la chaleur (f), it il calore (m), ro căldură (f)
    pt o limite (m), es el límite (m), ca el límit (m), fr la limite (f), it il limite (m), ro limită (f)
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Italian and Sardinian there are a lot of examples :

    It. l'estate (f) Sar. s'istìu (m) - summer
    It. la primavera (f) Sar. su berànu (m) - spring
    It. la sera (f) Sar. su sero (m) - evening
    It. la notte (f) Sar. su notte (m) - night
    It. il fico (m) Sar. sa figu (f) - fig
    It. la testuggine (f) Sar. su tostòine (m) - turtle
    It. l'orecchio (m) Sar. s'orìja (f) - ear (the J is pronounced like Y)
    It. il dente (m) Sar. sa dente (f) - tooth
    It. l'albero (m) Sar. s'àrvure (f) - tree
    It. il pomodoro (m) Sar. sa pumàta (f) - tomato
    It. il labbro (f) Sar. sa lara/lavra (f) - lip
    It. la pesca (f) Sar. su pèssiche, pèssighe (m) - peach (Lat. "persica, persicae")
    It. l'albicocca (f) Sar. su paracocco, barracocco (m) - apricot (Lat. "praecocus")
    It. la neve (f) Sar. su nie (m) - snow
    It. la grandine (f) Sar. su ràndine (m) - hail
    It. il merlo (m) Sar. sa mèrula (f) - blackbird
     
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    jmx

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    In Spanish there is also variation inside the language:

    olor, calor, (smell, heat) masculine in the "standard", but often feminine in regional dialects.

    mar, (sea) usually masculine but also feminine, even in the "standard".

    Other words with regional variation of gender: azúcar (sugar), sartén (pan).
     

    aum34

    Member
    Spanish & Catalan- Spain
    Sometimes the gender is different because it comes from different words in latin meaning the same, with different genders, for example with nose (example mentioned before), we have:

    NASUS (masc.) -> cat. el nas , fr. le nez, it. il naso ,ro. nas (n.)
    NāRIS (fem.)-> port, sp. -->In Spanish: La Nariz (fem.)

    Según mi diccionario "pavor" significa más bien horror que miedo. :confused:
    You are right. In Spanish (and I think in Portuguese is the same) we have: Temor (sp. masc) (from lat. TIMOR,masc), Pavor (sp, masc) (lat. PAVOR masc) and Miedo (sp., masc) / Medo (pt) (lat. METUS -masc-.)

    Miedo (sp.) is used as a general way to express FEAR.

    Temor is a higher degree of Miedo, there is also the verb Temer ( from lat. TIMERE) and Pavor is an extreme fear, kind of horror.
     
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    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Here's a historical complication, supported by an anecdote.
    There is a suburb of Los Angeles called "La Puente".
    A Spanish-speaker of my acquaintance was taking an attitude of "Tsk, tsk, bad grammar!"
    She speculated that the "La" might be derived from "L.A." (= Los Angeles).
    In reality, the word "puente" underwent a gender-change operation around the 18th century: earlier it was more often feminine, like "la fuente" continues to be.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Three words that are femenine in Catalan but masculine in all other major Romance languages:

    1) 'oregano'

    Catalan ORENGA f
    ---

    French ORIGAN m
    Italian ORIGANO m
    Portuguese ORÉGANO m
    Romanian OREGANO m
    Spanish ORÉGANO m
    2) 'rest (remainder)'

    Catalan RESTA f - Les darreres restes d'aquella civilització. Les restes mortals.
    ---
    French RESTE m - Les derniers restes de cette civilisation. Les restes mortels.

    Italian RESTO m - Gli ultimi resti di quella civiltà. I resti mortali.
    Portuguese RESTO m - Os últimos restos daquela civilização. Os restos mortais.
    Romanian REST n
    Spanish RESTO m - Los últimos restos de aquella civilización. Los restos mortales.

    3) 'tuna'

    Catalan TONYINA f - La tonyina blanca, la tonyina vermella.
    ---
    French THON m - Le thon blanc, le thon rouge.
    Italian TONNO m - Il tonno bianco, il tonno rosso.
    Portuguese ATUM m - O atum branco, o atum vermelho.
    Romanian TON m - Tonul alb, tonul roşu.
    Spanish ATÚN m - El atún blanco, el atún rojo.

     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    more in Italian and Sardinian

    It. la lepre (f) Sar. su lèpere (m) - hare
    It. l'arancia (f) Sar. s'arantzu (m) - orange
    It. il cucchiaio (m) Sar. sa cucciàra / cullera (f) - spoon (cucciàra is typical of north Sardinia, from Spanish "cuchara"; cullera is typical of the south, from Catalan "cullera")
    It. il caminetto (m) Sar. sa tziminèra / tziminèa (f) - fireplace (similar to Italian "ciminiera" = chimney)
    It. la vespa (f) Sar. su 'espe (m) - wasp
    It. il banco (m) - desk Sar. sa banca (f) - table
    It. il timore (m) Sar. sa timòria (f) - fear
    It. il vestiario (m) Sar. sa bestimenta (f) - wardrobe, clothes, vestment, elegant dress
    It. gli intestini (m) Sar. sas istentìnas (f) - intestines
    It. lo zolfo (m) Sar. sa sùlfera / bùlfera / bùlvera (f) - sulphur
    It. la rapina (f) Sar. s'irrobatoriu (m) - robbery
    It. la ruggine (f) Sar. su ruìnzu (m) - rust
    It. il singhiozzo (m) Sar. sa taccullitta / ticcullitta / tuccullitta / singullitta (f) - hiccup
     
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    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    And they are feminine too in Catalan: la sal, la mel, la llet, la sang.
    It seems that sang and sal are feminine while lach and mèl are masculine in Occitan.
    They are all masculine in Portuguese: sal, sangue, mel, leite.
    It seems that the gender of these words changed in the Occitan/Catalan/Castillan area.
     

    Angelo di fuoco

    Senior Member
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    Romanian:

    o echipă (f.)
    un râs (n.)
    un surâs (n.)


    In Romanian we don't have the cognate "pavor/paura" instead we use "teamă" (Lat. timere) and "frică" (Ngr. phrikē).

    Hope this helped!

    :) robbie
    Italian also has the rare téma (f) as opposed to tèma (m, "theme").
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    Sometimes the gender is different because it comes from different words in latin meaning the same, with different genders, for example with nose (example mentioned before), we have:

    NASUS (masc.) -> cat. el nas , fr. le nez, it. il naso ,ro. nas (n.)
    NāRIS (fem.)-> port, sp. -->In Spanish: La Nariz (fem.)



    You are right. In Spanish (and I think in Portuguese is the same) we have: Temor (sp. masc) (from lat. TIMOR,masc), Pavor (sp, masc) (lat. PAVOR masc) and Miedo (sp., masc) / Medo (pt) (lat. METUS -masc-.)

    Miedo (sp.) is used as a general way to express FEAR.

    Temor is a higher degree of Miedo, there is also the verb Temer ( from lat. TIMERE) and Pavor is an extreme fear, kind of horror.
    In Spanish we also have la pavura, so with the same gender as the Italian or French counterpart, even if it is not so common.

    From RAE:

    pavura

    1. f. Temor o pavor.

    And always the RAE describes pavor as:

    1. m. Temor, con espanto o sobresalto.
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    Three words that are femenine in Catalan but masculine in all other major Romance languages:

    1) 'oregano'

    Catalan ORENGA f
    ---

    French ORIGAN m
    Italian ORIGANO m
    Portuguese ORÉGANO m
    Romanian OREGANO m
    Spanish ORÉGANO m
    2) 'rest (remainder)'

    Catalan RESTA f - Les darreres restes d'aquella civilització. Les restes mortals.
    ---
    French RESTE m - Les derniers restes de cette civilisation. Les restes mortels.

    Italian RESTO m - Gli ultimi resti di quella civiltà. I resti mortali.
    Portuguese RESTO m - Os últimos restos daquela civilização. Os restos mortais.
    Romanian REST n
    Spanish RESTO m - Los últimos restos de aquella civilización. Los restos mortales.

    3) 'tuna'

    Catalan TONYINA f - La tonyina blanca, la tonyina vermella.
    ---
    French THON m - Le thon blanc, le thon rouge.
    Italian TONNO m - Il tonno bianco, il tonno rosso.
    Portuguese ATUM m - O atum branco, o atum vermelho.
    Romanian TON m - Tonul alb, tonul roşu.
    Spanish ATÚN m - El atún blanco, el atún rojo.

    I think I have heard in Sassarese la restha for the rest, but I'm not 100% sure. There is also lu resthu, anyways.
    As for tonyina, you have this word in feminine even in Spanish, la tonina, even though it is not so common, so it is not an exclusive Catalan usage.
    I quote from the RAE dictionary:

    tonina


    Der. del lat. thunnus 'atún', y este del gr. θύννος thýnnos.

    1. f. atún (‖ pez).

    2. f. delfín1.
     
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    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    Romanian:

    o echipă (f.)
    un râs (n.)
    un surâs (n.)


    In Romanian we don't have the cognate "pavor/paura" instead we use "teamă" (Lat. timere) and "frică" (Ngr. phrikē).

    Hope this helped!

    :) robbie
    We also have équipe feminine in French, l'équipe, and in Portuguese, a equipa in Portugal and a equipe in Brazil.
    In Spanish it is masculine though, el equipo.
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    In Italian and Sardinian there are a lot of examples :

    It. l'estate (f) Sar. s'istìu (m) - summer
    It. la primavera (f) Sar. su berànu (m) - spring
    It. la sera (f) Sar. su sero (m) - evening
    It. la notte (f) Sar. su notte (m) - night
    It. il fico (m) Sar. sa figu (f) - fig
    It. la testuggine (f) Sar. su tostòine (m) - turtle
    It. l'orecchio (m) Sar. s'orìja (f) - ear (the J is pronounced like Y)
    It. il dente (m) Sar. sa dente (f) - tooth
    It. l'albero (m) Sar. s'àrvure (f) - tree
    It. il pomodoro (m) Sar. sa pumàta (f) - tomato Also sa tamata in central Sardinia and tamàtiga in the South.
    It. il labbro (f) Sar. sa lara/lavra (f) - lip
    It. la pesca (f) Sar. su pèssiche, pèssighe (m) - peach (Lat. "persica, persicae")
    It. l'albicocca (f) Sar. su paracocco, barracocco (m) - apricot (Lat. "praecocus") Su piricoc(c)o in the centre.
    It. la neve (f) Sar. su nie (m) - snow
    It. la grandine (f) Sar. su ràndine (m) - hail
    It. il merlo (m) Sar. sa mèrula (f) - blackbird
    more in Italian and Sardinian

    It. la lepre (f) Sar. su lèpere (m) - hare
    It. l'arancia (f) Sar. s'arantzu (m) - orange
    It. il cucchiaio (m) Sar. sa cucciàra / cullera (f) - spoon (cucciàra is typical of north Sardinia, from Spanish "cuchara"; cullera is typical of the south, from Catalan "cullera")
    It. il caminetto (m) Sar. sa tziminèra / tziminèa (f) - fireplace (similar to Italian "ciminiera" = chimney) Yes, like Spanish la chimenea, for example...In the centre it is sa giminera.
    It. la vespa (f) Sar. su 'espe (m) - wasp Also su 'espu (ghespu).
    It. il banco (m) - desk Sar. sa banca (f) - table
    It. il timore (m) Sar. sa timòria (f) - fear
    It. il vestiario (m) Sar. sa bestimenta (f) - wardrobe, clothes, vestment, elegant dress
    It. gli intestini (m) Sar. sas istentìnas (f) - intestines I didn't know sas istentinas but sas intragnas (Spanish las entrañas).
    It. lo zolfo (m) Sar. sa sùlfera / bùlfera / bùlvera (f) - sulphur
    It. la rapina (f) Sar. s'irrobatoriu (m) - robbery
    It. la ruggine (f) Sar. su ruìnzu (m) - rust
    It. il singhiozzo (m) Sar. sa taccullitta / ticcullitta / tuccullitta / singullitta (f) - hiccup Sa tzicuria more down south.
     
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    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Some feminine loanwords from French have been adapted as masculine by Spanish: el equipo, el bucle, el champán, el entrecot, el gofre.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    It. gli intestini (m) Sar. sas istentìnas (f) - intestines I didn't know sas intestinas but sas intragnas (Spanish las entrañas).


    Also here we use to say "sas intragnas", but it's referred to all the entrails, while "sas istentinas" is specifical to the intestines

    p.s.

    curiosity :

    The same phenomenon of change intestinas -> istentinas; happens also in Corsican language : intestinu -> stintina (pl. stintine)
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    It. gli intestini (m) Sar. sas istentìnas (f) - intestines I didn't know sas intestinas but sas intragnas (Spanish las entrañas).


    Also here we use to say "sas intragnas", but it's referred to all the entrails, while "sas istentinas" is specifical to the intestines

    p.s.

    curiosity :

    The same phenomenon of change intestinas -> istentinas; happens also in Corsican language : intestinu -> stintina (pl. stintine)
    Thanks, it could also be that I heard that, I'm not sure. I will ask my acquaintances if they know the word.

    Does the village Isthintini/Stintino have something to do with that? :D
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    Another word that is different in some languages is the noun for day (I mean the one derived from Latin dies, therefore not jour/giorno, for example).
    In Sardinian is feminine, sa die/sa dì, and so is also in Sassarese/Gallurese, la dì.
    In Romanian is also feminine, o zi (one day).

    On the contrary, it is masculine in Spanish, el día, Portuguese, o dia, Catalan, el dia, and Italian, il dì.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Another word that is different in some languages is the noun for day (I mean the one derived from Latin dies, therefore not jour/giorno, for example).
    In Sardinian is feminine, sa die/sa dì, and so is also in Sassarese/Gallurese, la dì.
    In Romanian is also feminine, o zi (one day).

    On the contrary, it is masculine in Spanish, el día, Portuguese, o dia, Catalan, el dia, and Italian, il dì.
    In this area of Sardinia (Mejlogu) and in northwestern Sardinia in general we use to say them both masculine and feminine with a slight change of meaning :

    Sardinian - Italian

    su die = il giorno
    sa die = la giornata

    su notte = la notte
    sa notte = la nottata
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    In this area of Sardinia (Mejlogu) and in northwestern Sardinia in general we use to say them both masculine and feminine with a slight change of meaning :

    Sardinian - Italian

    su die = il giorno
    sa die = la giornata

    su notte = la notte
    sa notte = la nottata
    Yes I knew that in some parts of Logudoro they also say su die, but in central Sardinia as well as in the south it is just sa die/sa dì, I am sure, and there is not any difference like in these Italian nouns (giorno and giornata). The same applies for Sassarese and, as far as I know, for Gallurese.

    As for su notte/sa notte, I know both depending on the area or both also in the same village. For instance, in the village where I have relatives, central Sardinian more Logudorese than Campidanese, they use both, sometimes without making difference at all, but more masculine anyways, more than all in standard sentences (at night is a su notte, also a de notte), I have never heard such sentences in feminine).
    So, they don't make a difference like in Italian notte/nottata here either (at night is in Italian di notte, and in Sardinian they say it in masculine). I have always thought that the more ancient or correct was the masculine, and the feminine perhaps because of the Italian influence, but that was just my thought, I have actually no clue about that.
     
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    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    About the sentences "di giorno / di notte", the structure here is a bit different :

    di giorno = a de die
    di notte = a de notte
    a tarda notte = a notte manna

    in pieno giorno = a die manna


    while sentences like "di mattina / di sera" have another kind of structure

    di mattina = a parte (d)e manzanu
    di sera = a parte (d)e sero
    di mattina presto = a manzanu chito
    di mattina prestissimo / all'alba = a manzanile
    al canto del gallo = a s'impuddile
    di pomeriggio = passadu mesu die
    di sera tardi = a tardu mannu
     

    Floridsdorfer

    Senior Member
    Italian, Spanish, Sardinian (trilingual)
    About the sentences "di giorno / di notte", the structure here is a bit different :

    di giorno = a de die Yes it is like that also in my area.
    di notte = a de notte The same.
    a tarda notte = a notte manna
    I guess I heard one or both of these, I don't know if they are still very common though. Maybe the first one more.
    in pieno giorno = a die manna

    while sentences like "di mattina / di sera" have another kind of structure

    di mattina = a parte (d)e manzanu Yes I heard both and they use them, just with "merìe" statt "sero".
    di sera = a parte (d)e sero
    di mattina presto = a manzanu chito
    Very common, but "chitzo" statt "chito".
    di mattina prestissimo / all'alba = a manzanile No, they don't use this. That would be "abreschende" ("arbeschende") or "a s'abreschidozu/abreschidògiu", "a s'abrèschida" ("arbèschida").
    al canto del gallo = a s'impuddile Neither this, unfortunately. Or at least I haven't heard it.
    di pomeriggio = passadu mesu die A bit down south it is a little bit different. They don't use "sero" at all, it doesn't even exist the concept of something like the Italian "sera", while both "the afternoon"/"il pomeriggio" and "the beginning of the evening" are su merìe (more to the south, already in the Campidanese area, exactly the same but "su merì"). Afterwards it is su notte. That would be starting with the evening already, before "the night" like in English or in Italian and exactly the same as in Spanish with "la tarde" and then "la noche", no "evening" (it is like that also in Catalan and Portuguese). So, "di pomeriggio" is a merìe und "di sera" is a de notte. For this reason, they never use "passa(d)u mesu die" in this context, it would be useless because that's already "a merìe". If they use this expression they just mean that "midday has already gone".
    di sera tardi = a tardu mannu Sure they use that.

    It has occurred to me also the noun for "the morning". It is feminine in some romance languages and masculine in others.

    The origin of the Spanish, Sardinian, Portuguese, Romanian, Sassarese and Gallurese terms is the Latin (hora) maneāna, whereas the French, Catalan and Italian counterparts derive from Latin (tempus) matutīnum.

    Masculine: French, le matin, Catalan, el matí, Sardinian, su manzanu/mangianu, Sassarese, lu manzanu.

    Masculine or feminine: Italian, il mattino or la mattina, where il mattino is more "the early morning" and its usage is more limited or specific for some idiomatic phrases like di buon mattino, "early in the morning".
    (By the way in Spanish language we have several words with the same origin like the Italian, French or Catalan: matutino/a, matutinal, matinal, la matinal, la matiné, los maitines (matines) and, even if not in use anymore as the Real Academia says, el matino for "la mañana". In Argentina it is possible to hear, in the colloquial language, la matina).

    Feminine: Spanish, la mañana, Portuguese, a manhã, Gallurese, la manzana, Romanian, (o) dimineața.
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    As for tonyina, you have this word in feminine even in Spanish, la tonina, even though it is not so common, so it is not an exclusive Catalan usage.
    I quote from the RAE dictionary:

    tonina


    Der. del lat. thunnus 'atún', y este del gr. θύννος thýnnos.

    1. f. atún (‖ pez).

    2. f. delfín1.
    Interesting, thanks. I would say, though, that it was uncommon in the past and rather obsolete nowadays, because I have never heard or read it and the Corpus does not seem to include it much in the last centuries (and when it does, it looks as if it is referred to the second meaning, a type of dolphin, probably a local usage in some Latin American countries).

    I've also found toñina in the DRAE, with the mark of Andalusian. I wouldn't be surprised if the origin of it was an old Catalanism introduced by sailors. Some other fish like the rape or the pagel are Catalanisms in Spanish too. Or it could also be a Mossarabic relic.
     

    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Just wanted to add those words in Romanian that were missing from your list Jazyk and their gender.

    Romanian:
    4. in Romanian you can use the word labrum* (n.) for "lip", but the most common is "buză".
    7. tomată (f.)
    robbie
    I've never heard of labrum to be in usage! It's from Anatomy, which is why this word stays in Latin.
    And for 7, we often use roşii, which is why 'tomată' can be found on the cans with boiled tomatos: pastă de tomate.

    Though we never ask for tomate when going to the market, it's interesting to know how this word has come to be used in a technological process.
     
    Last edited:

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    I've never heard of labrum to be in usage! It's from Anatomy, which is why this word stays in Latin.
    And for 7, we often use roşii, which is why 'tomată' can be found on the cans with boiled tomatos: pastă de tomate.

    Though we never ask for tomate when going to the market, it's interesting to know how this word has come to be used in a technological process.
    It depends on the context Irinet – when it comes to labrum, anatomists and doctors are more likely to use the term than any schmo off the street. The term is also specifically used to designate the upper lip of an insect so it admittedly belongs to scientific vocabulary.

    Tomată according to DEX is both a regional and literary term.
     
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