Romance languages: haesitare, hesitar, hesitate, esitare...

Roi Marphille

Senior Member
Catalonia, Catalan.
Hi to all,

The other day I received a fax from a Portuguese provider, the last part stated: ..."para qualquer assunto de que necessitem por favor nâo hesitem em contactar-nos"

wow! "hesitar"! :confused: I didn't know that verb in Portuguese! My obvious first though was that it was a "borrowed" word from English (to hesitate) but I found it odd, so I had done some research;

Conclusions are that the verb come from Latin "haesitare" :tick: . Then I learned an amazing thing. The verb "hesitar" does exist in my language (Catalan) and I didn't know it!, it also exists in Castilian-Spanish (I didn't know it either) and other Latin languages! but I had first associated this word with English language. Odd. Reason: they kept it in use..;)

This experience made me a little sad because I learn that there are many words out there that are disappearing in my language.. When I speak with my grandma, for instance, I reckon that she uses many expressions and words that are barely in use.:confused:

Did a similar experience happen to you ? I mean, to discover a new word in your own language. How did it happen? sometimes it happens meanwhile learning other languages!

btw, I compromise to use "hesitar" even no-one is going to understand me

cheers,
Roi
 
  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    We have the word "duvidar", but usually it means "to doubt". Perhaps in some contexts it can mean "to hesitate", but I can't think of one off the top of my head.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Shouldn't we move this thread to the Cultural Issues, since it has nothing to do with translation or definition of a sentence or a phrase. It's all about our own experience with some special words ... just a guess.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Here is something curios...I didn't find this word in the 1730s RAE diccionario de autoridades. It seems to appear first in the RAE in the 1920s! Can anyone explain this?
     

    Roi Marphille

    Senior Member
    Catalonia, Catalan.
    Whodunit said:
    Shouldn't we move this thread to the Cultural Issues, since it has nothing to do with translation or definition of a sentence or a phrase. It's all about our own experience with some special words ... just a guess.
    Well, actually I had in mind to set it there. But the topic is about languages even that the phenomenon of disappearing words may be considered "cultural" for some.

    Yep, go ahead if you want. :tick:

     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Roi Marphille said:
    Well, actually I had in mind to set it there. But the topic is about languages even that the phenomenon of disappearing words may be considered "cultural" for some.

    Yep, go ahead if you want. :tick:

    I'd like to move it, but I can't. Because I'm just a forero like you and others. Cuchu may disagree with me, otherwise he would already have moved it. :p
     

    Roi Marphille

    Senior Member
    Catalonia, Catalan.
    cuchuflete said:
    Here is something curios...I didn't find this word in the 1730s RAE diccionario de autoridades. It seems to appear first in the RAE in the 1920s! Can anyone explain this?
    I definetelly can't. I'd say the guys from 1730 were quite busy making wars and all and maybe their research was not accurate enough..

    But I bet there is some Spanish speaking country where this word is still in use.
    And what about Italy..do they use it? "esitare" :confused:

    Hey!
    don't hesitate to replay!!! :D
     
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