Romanesco dialect: Commisa’, me deve da stà a sentì

LozzaNeedsHelp

New Member
English - England
Ciao a tutti!

I've come across a sentence from a novel, and I'm trying to get to grips with what it means. From the looks of it, it's dialetto romanesco, a dialect I am not familiar with.
In context, it is a man telling a police officer that there has been an incident during the Corpus Domini in Rome involving a gattara (taken from the novel Le indagini del commissario Ponzetti, by Giovanni Ricciardi). The entire conversation is:


«Commisa’, è successo er guaio».

«Il solito, Arturo?».

«Commisa’, me deve da stà a sentì! Hanno messo sotto ’a gattara!».

«Ma che dici?».

«Sì, commissa’. Da quella parte!».

The gist of what I have is that the man is telling the officer that there has been an issue, to which the officer replies "the usual?" (as the man and the gattara have had arguments before), but I do not understand the following line: is he telling him to listen to him, and that it has happened below the gattara's house? Or that something has happened to the gattara?
I've searched the phrase in Google but the only hits I'm getting are from this book, are there any Romans/people who understand the dialect who have a better idea than I?

Grazie mille!
 
  • Benzene

    Senior Member
    Italian from Italy
    Hello LNH!

    I suggest: "commisa’, me deve da stà a sentì! Hanno messo sotto ’a gattara!»" = "superintendent, you have to listen! Somebody knocked down the cat Lady!".

    Bye,

    Benzene
     

    Tom S. Fox

    Senior Member
    German
    “Commisa’, me deve da stà a sentì! Hanno messo sotto ’a gattara!” = “Commissario, mi deve da stare a sentire! Hanno messo sotto la gattara!” = “Commissario, mi deve ascoltare! Hanno messo sotto la gattara!”
     

    LozzaNeedsHelp

    New Member
    English - England
    Thank you so much for your help Benzene and Tom! That makes a lot more sense! :)
    I have another question if you have any idea?
    In the line «Sì, commissa’. Da quella parte!», is he saying that the incident happened in a certain area of town e.g. where he and the cat lady live? So that it links up with "hanno messo sotto 'a gattara da quella parte"?

    Thank you again!
     

    A User

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I do not understand the following line: is he telling him to listen to him, and that something has happened to the gattara?
    "Una gattara viene investita in mezzo alla strada: unico testimone, un barbone al quarto litro di bianco. Il resto della via, … saranno state quasi le otto, non vede nulla…"
     
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