Romanian 'mătase'

robbie_SWE

Senior Member
Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
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Frank
Moderator EHL

Here are other translation from Indoeuropean languages:
...
Romanian: Mătase
...

Ciao
Sorry if this is totally off topic, but why is the Romanian word so different from all the other Indo-European languages? Dexonline attributes the Romanian word to the Latin metaxa.

:) robbie
 
  • modus.irrealis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    Interestingly enough, the Greek dictionary I checked for μέταξα says etymology unknown but mentions that mataxa is attested earlier in Latin), while the Latin dictionary for metaxa / mataxa that = μέταξα / μάταξα. Either way it looks like the ultimate origin lies in some other language.

    Perhaps dexonline chose Latin because of the ă in mătăse (I'm assuming here that an ă would come from a and not e) while the Greek forms seem to have survived with an e in the first syllable (modern Greek μετάξι e.g.)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Believe me when I say that I asked myself the same question, but Dexonline is quite sure about it. If you know Romanian take a look.

    Maybe someone who knows Greek can help!?

    :) robbie
    I can understand the most important parts, but unfortunately, the only thing that is really important for us is "Lat. metaxa". :(

    Interestingly enough, the Greek dictionary I checked for μέταξα says etymology unknown but mentions that mataxa is attested earlier in Latin), while the Latin dictionary for metaxa / mataxa that = μέταξα / μάταξα. Either way it looks like the ultimate origin lies in some other language.
    I was asking this myself when I wrote my question to Robbie: What does Greek μέταξα have to do with mătase?

    Perhaps dexonline chose Latin because of the ă in mătăse (I'm assuming here that an ă would come from a and not e) while the Greek forms seem to have survived with an e in the first syllable (modern Greek μετάξι e.g.)
    Etymologically, you might be right, but isn't the ă pronounced like a schwa?
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I can understand the most important parts, but unfortunately, the only thing that is really important for us is "Lat. metaxa". :(



    I was asking this myself when I wrote my question to Robbie: What does Greek μέταξα have to do with mătase?



    Etymologically, you might be right, but isn't the ă pronounced like a schwa?
    ă is pronounced like e from English article the.
    There are very few words in Romanian which have Greek origin. There are much more in Aromanian, for example...

    However, most of the Romanian words related with classic fabric manufacturing are of Latin origin (aţă = line, iţă = shaft, lână = wool, pânză = cloth, fir = stitch etc.) (non-neologisms, of course). Some of the newest materials are of other origins (especially Turkic) but I can't figure out any of Greek origin, as far as I know.
     

    demalaga

    Member
    España castellano
    I have found Lat mataxa. It has derived words in Spanish madeja Catalan madeixa Italian matassa.
     

    demalaga

    Member
    España castellano
    My knowledge of Romanian is very limited but from this definition
    Fibră textilă vegetală sau sintetică fabricată prin diverse procedee chimice şi având proprietăţi asemănătoare cu cele ale firului de borangic.
    It seems that the real word for silk is borangic.Please correct me if I am wrong.
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    My knowledge of Romanian is very limited but from this definition
    Fibră textilă vegetală sau sintetică fabricată prin diverse procedee chimice şi având proprietăţi asemănătoare cu cele ale firului de borangic.
    It seems that the real word for silk is borangic.Please correct me if I am wrong.
    Borangic is of Turkish origin (bűrűncűk). The word came into the Romanian language in the last 3-4 centuries, as an alternative word.
     
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