Rome city, Madrid city, Paris city / The city of Rome, The city of Madrid

Solitario

Senior Member
Perú Spanish
Some people I know have the custom of saying:
Rome city, Madrid city, Paris city and so on

I understand that you should say:
The city of Rome, The city of Madrid, The city of Paris and so on.

Of course I also understand that you should say:
New York City
Mexico City

Washington DC

But can you say:
The London City underground system?

Please, can you give other examples?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Hmmmm....I can´t think of any rule, but it seems to me that the only time we would put city after the name is when city is part of the name. For example I think that both Mexico City and New York City include the word city as part of their official name. And I suppose that is because they are located in a country or state by the same name. I can´t think of any other cities at the moment that include city as part of the name.

    We can also put city after the name when it functions as an adjective, such as the Boston city bus system, the Phoenix city limits, etc.

    If you are referring to the city itself, outside of the exceptions mentioned above, you will say "the city of Buenos Aires, the city of Paris, etc.

    Perhaps other foreros will have a better explanation.
     

    Phryne

    Senior Member
    Argieland--Esp/Eng
    gotitadeleche said:
    Hmmmm....I can´t think of any rule, but it seems to me that the only time we would put city after the name is when city is part of the name. For example I think that both Mexico City and New York City include the word city as part of their official name. And I suppose that is because they are located in a country or state by the same name. I can´t think of any other cities at the moment that include city as part of the name.

    We can also put city after the name when it functions as an adjective, such as the Boston city bus system, the Phoenix city limits, etc.

    If you are referring to the city itself, outside of the exceptions mentioned above, you will say "the city of Buenos Aires, the city of Paris, etc.

    Perhaps other foreros will have a better explanation.
    I agree with you. And furthermore, I've also seen the "city of New York" as "The city of New York would like to invite you to ...". It seems to me that "Mexico City" and "New York City" are only used when the speaker wants to be precise that it's not the State/country. In any other case one would only say "Madrid", a secas.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    gotitadeleche said:
    I can´t think of any other cities at the moment that include city as part of the name.
    Atlantic City. :)

    I suppose "Atlantic" alone could be confused with the ocean.
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    Salt Lake City
    Oklahoma City
    Jefferson City
    Kansas City
    Johnson City
    Carson City
    (and many more)

    None of these can be expressed, as far as I know, without "City", and these are their official names... otherwise they will be confused with other cities/states/people/etc.
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Solitario said:
    But can you say:
    The London City underground system?
    You can say it and people will understand what you mean. But there is a small part (the oldest part) of London known as the City of London. The London underground system serves the City of London as well as the rest of London. But if you say "the London City underground system" it sounds as if you're saying that the City of London (the area) has its own underground system, which it doesn't. So, it's more usual to say "the London Underground system", or more informally, "the London tube system".
     
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