Roosevelt intended to do with <it>

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Background: Roosevelt promised in general election his voters "a new deal" without giving details. Hoover's unpopularity in fact ensured the Roosevelt's victory.

Then the author Alan Brinkley writes:

Roosevelt won by a landslide. <.......>Democrates won majorites in both houses of Congress. It was a convincing mandate, but it was not yet clear that Roosevelt intended to do with it.​

Source: Alan Brinkley's The Unfinished Nation (4th edition) Page 672

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The question of this thread is "Roosevelt intended to do with what." Grammatically, it seems clear that he intended to do with the convincing mandate. The problem for my understanding is that the mandate is "you"-Roosevelt to be the President of the United States. Since you accepted the nomination, you intended to be the next president. So "it" should have referred to otherwise. Does "it" refer to the "new deal"? The text between "a new deal" and "it" is a bit too much and I am not sure.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think there's a typo in the sentence, and it should say ' . . . but it was not yet clear what Roosevelt intended to do with it.'

    It was not clear what he intended to do with the convincing mandate.'
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Grammatically, it seems clear that he intended to do with the convincing mandate.
    Yes.

    The problem for my understanding is that the mandate is "you"-Roosevelt to be the President of the United States. Since you accepted the nomination, you intended to be the next president.
    That's not what "mandate" means in this context in American politics. The term refers to the politician's political freedom to enact his agenda. A politican elected with only 38% of the vote (the remaining 62% split among several losers) does not have a mandate and is expected to govern in a restrained way. A politician who wins by a landslide 70% is understood to have the broad support of the people in enacting the policies he proposes.

    I think there's a typo in the sentence, and it should say ' . . . but it was not yet clear what Roosevelt intended to do with it.'
    It's correct in the original text.
     
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