rough-cut hair

evergreen.soll

Senior Member
portuguese
Hello, what does "rough-cut hair" mean? Does it mean not cut in a good way? badly cut?

He grinned and tossed back thick rough-cut hair the color of butter, only lightly streaked with gray. (Go Tell the Spartans By Jerry Pournelle, S. M. Stirling)​
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The writer doesn't seem to know much about hair. There's no such things as gray/grey hair, only white hair that blends in with your natural hair colour. Butter (blond) and white do not make grey!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What I mean is that grey hair is the result of a combination of white/colourless hairs blending in with your normal hair colour. The darker the natural colour, the more grey the resultant colour, since black and white make grey.

    But admittedly it might have been more accurate to say there's no such thing as "a" grey hair! :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    But admittedly it might have been more accurate to say there's no such thing as "a" grey hair! :)
    I'm sorry, but we also say "I have a grey hair." There's nothing at all to comment on in saying "butter lightly streaked with grey" as far as I'm concerned.
    (Not really applicable, but for horse breeders there's no such thing as a white horse. What color was George Washington's white horse? Grey.)
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    I think lingobingo's point is well taken. A mixture of dark and white hairs gives the appearance of grey, but a mixture of blond and white hairs would just give the appearance of a lighter shade of blond.
     

    evergreen.soll

    Senior Member
    portuguese
    I wouldn't take it to mean "badly cut", no. In fact, just the opposite: a haircut so skillfully done in deliberately wide and uneven sections so that it would fall back into place after any kind of disarray, whether by wind or fingers.
    Thanks, so it's done deliberately cut in a way to look uneven or careless, am I right?
     
    I'm sorry, but we also say "I have a grey hair." There's nothing at all to comment on in saying "butter lightly streaked with grey" as far as I'm concerned.
    (Not really applicable, but for horse breeders there's no such thing as a white horse. What color was George Washington's white horse? Grey.)
    I agree. I'm not sure what the point is in being so technical as to say there's no such things as grey, because it's really just a blend of black and white, so it's an optical illusion. The word grey is not an illusion, however; it came out of this and other languages to describe precisely what we see long before the theories of light were observed and proposed.

    The OP statement does not say, or even imply, that the "butter color" and white make grey. That is why the word "streaked" was used to mean what it says, separate strands of.
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think lingobingo's point is well taken. A mixture of dark and white hairs gives the appearance of grey, but a mixture of blond and white hairs would just give the appearance of a lighter shade of blond.
    So you think that people who were originally blonde just go platinum and never worry about dying their hair?
    Helen Mirren was originally blonde. Does this seem like a lighter shade of blonde or is it grey? I'd say it's grey.
     
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