rough edges that you might ladder your tights on?

Baltic Sea

Banned
Polish
Hello all users!

Using sand paper get rid of any rough edges that you might ladder your tights on.

In my opinion, the text in bold type means rough edges which/that might cause you to ladder your tights or rough edges which/that might cause your tights to ladder (i.e. develop ladder-shaped nasty holes down or up a stocking/tights). At any rate, the general idea is that a woman dealing with rough edges might spring / catch / run / get / snag a ladder on/against such edges.
Am I right? Thank you.
Using sand paper get rid of any rough edges that you might ladder your tights on.
This term is from How To Build a Larsen Trap.Under the 12th picture in line 6 is this text:Using sand paper get rid of any rough edges that you might ladder your tights on.
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    >>Am I right? Thank you.<<

    You understand correctly. In American English we'd refer to a run in one's stockings or pantyhose rather than the British usage of "ladder" and "tights."
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    Thank you. I see. I have another question related to the main one. Is it possible to say "to spring / catch / run / get / snag a ladder on or against something?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The original means
    ... rough edges that might ladder your tights if you should happen to brush up against them.
    I don't really like your versions.
    rough edges which/that might cause you to ladder your tights. The rough edges are forcing you to attack your tights with scissors.
    rough edges which/that might cause your tights to ladder The rough edges use their psychic powers to ladder your tights at a distance.

    (Note: The American version would be rather different as I can't think of an equivalent verb to BE "ladder." We call that "a run in your stockings," but you don't "run your stockings.")
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    Thank you. I know you are 100 % in the right. I would like you to consider the use of on or against something in "to spring / catch / run / get / snag a ladder on or against something". Which preposition is more correct in your opinion?
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    By all means.
    The verb 'ladder' can be both transitive and intransitive.
    to (cause to) develop such a flaw I laddered my best pair of tights today; Fine stockings ladder very easily.

    also

    (Clothing, Personal Arts & Crafts / Knitting & Sewing) Chiefly Brit to cause a line of interconnected stitches in (stockings, etc.) to undo, as by snagging, or (of a stocking) to come undone in this way.

    The above-mentioned definitions and examples come from The FreeDictionary.

    << Please can we be a little more careful with pasting text from the FreeDictionary? - several multi-lingual lines of text deleted >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Is it possible to ladder one's tights against something? Against = on in case of laddering a stocking.
    No, I don't think so, BS.

    I laddered my tights on...:tick:
    I laddered my tights against...:confused:

    By the way, I think the writer in your source was probably joking. I imagine that most readers of his blog would be male - and would therefore (probably!) not be tights-wearers:).
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank you, Loob. I couldn't agree more. Still, there is the verb 'ladder', isn't there?
    Yes, there is (at least in BrE:)) a verb "ladder": I laddered my tights. I laddered my stockings.

    Here's the WR English dictionary on the subject:
    verb
    Brit. (with reference to tights or stockings) develop or cause to develop a ladder.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    If you're writing something only for a British audience, you're probably fine. But Americans do NOT use ladder this way and may not even understand what you mean.

    But the solution is easy. If something is rough enough to put a run in your stockings, it may well damage your other clothing as well. Why don't you just say "rough edges that you might snag your clothing on"?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi Sparky. I'm pretty sure the text that BS is asking about was written by a Brit:).

    And reverting to his original question - yes, you've understood it correctly, BS!
     

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    To repeat more clearly:
    BrE tights = AmE stockings
    BrE ladder (noun) = AmE run (noun)
    BrE ladder (verb) = AmE :confused: (verb) AmE verbal form would be "to get a run in."
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Looking back at Sparky's post 13 ...

    We use "snag" in BrE too - again with "on" rather than "against". But I snagged my tights would mean something different from I laddered my tights: it would mean you caught a thread (or threads) in your tights, not that you created a ladder [= run].

    I'm wondering, though, if BrE I laddered my tights on the chair might be translatable in AmE as I put a run in my pantyhose on the chair - still with "on" rather than "against"? Or would that not make sense?



    PS. I'm pretty sure, MuttQuad, that BrE tights = AmE pantyhose, while AmE stockings = BrE stockings:D
     
    Last edited:

    MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    >> PS. I'm pretty sure, MuttQuad, that BrE tights = AmE pantyhose, while AmE stockings = BrE stockings:D<<

    Americans commonly say "stockings" even though they are really referring to pantyhose. Individual stockings are, of course, always "stockings," but "tights" mean things along the lines of ballet tights here, usually opaque and/or patterned.



     
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