Rough hair

just_olga

Member
Russian
Amidst this sordid scene, sat a man with his clenched hands resting
on his knees, and his eyes bent on the ground. I knew Mr.
Rochester; though the begrimed face, the disordered dress (his coat
hanging loose from one arm, as if it had been almost torn from his
back in a scuffle), the desperate and scowling countenance, the
rough, bristling hair
might well have disguised him.

(Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre)


Does "rough" mean "coarse", or is it closer in meaning to "tousled" in this context? Thank you in advance! :)
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Your example begins "Amidst this sordid scene," can you tell us what has happened, and why Mr Rochester is like this?
     

    just_olga

    Member
    Russian
    Your example begins "Amidst this sordid scene," can you tell us what has happened, and why Mr Rochester is like this?
    Sure :) The guests at Thornfield Hall house are playing charades, and Mr Rochester portrays a prisoner in one of the scenes:

    On its (the curtain's) third rising only a portion of the drawing-room was
    disclosed; the rest being concealed by a screen, hung with some sort
    of dark and coarse drapery. The marble basin was removed; in its
    place, stood a deal table and a kitchen chair: these objects were
    visible by a very dim light proceeding from a horn lantern, the wax
    candles being all extinguished.

    Amidst this sordid scene...
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks.

    "... the rough, bristling hair"
    is a description of what must be tousled hair - Mr Rochester has obviously made his hair look untidy - like a prisoner.

    Rough - uncombed/unkempt.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top