Rough it!

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Someone told me she doesn’t want to memorize the theory of chairman Mao because it’s really boring and I said:

You have to rough it! You need to pass the exam!

Is it idiomatic?
 
  • Jenson

    Member
    American English
    I wouldn't say rough it in this case– that means more of living in less than ideal conditions or without luxuries. Perhaps "You just have to deal with it! You need to pass the exam."
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Not really.
    To rough it is used to suggest basic living conditions, not an aspect of studying.
    I'm sure there are many suitable phrases to do what you want, but I would say:
    'You'll just have to get on with it ....'
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    If you want to say this pretty colloquially, you could say "You just have to suck it up. You need to pass the exam."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    You appear to mean "tough."

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © Harper Collins Publishers::

    tough /tʌf/
    vb

    • (transitive) slang to stand firm, hold out against (a difficulty or difficult situation) (esp in tough it out)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You appear to mean "tough."

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © Harper Collins Publishers::

    tough /tʌf/
    vb

    • (transitive) slang to stand firm, hold out against (a difficulty or difficult situation) (esp in tough it out)
    maybe you do. But it is not something we say much on the UK.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I find myself in exceedingly rare disagreement with Mr. Graham. To me, "tough it out", while familiar as an expression, is situational, not a reference to a specific, discrete task. It might refer, for example, to continuing to attend a course taught by a very strict teacher—i.e., until the end of the school term. Or if someone is learning to move around again as a broken leg is healing; again, there's a period of time involved.

    This memorization is a specific task that must be done in order for the student to pass. I think Jenson's "deal with it" works, as does Suzi's "get on with it". Mathman's "suck it up" (very informal AE slang, to be used only with a friend), which means something a little different (just accept this) is also an appropriate comment. Personally, I'd probably say, "Hey, it's required. Just do it."
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    (snip)

    This memorization is a specific task that must be done in order for the student to pass. I think Jenson's "deal with it" works, as does Suzi's "get on with it". Mathman's "suck it up" (very informal AE slang, to be used only with a friend), which means something a little different (just accept this) is also an appropriate comment. Personally, I'd probably say, "Hey, it's required. Just do it."
    "Suck it up" doesn't only mean "just accept this." It can also mean "deal with it (stop complaining, stop whining...)."

    I used to hear parents tell their soccer-playing child to "suck it up" when the child complained of being tired during a game. I didn't agree with their telling the child that, but they meant exactly what I said above. It seems to me that this is the meaning that Silverobama is looking for.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I agree that rough it means something different. My first thought was "Just live with it/get on with it!". I wouldn't have understood what was meant by "suck it up", by the way.;)
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    I agree that rough it means something different. My first thought was "Just live with it/get on with it!". I wouldn't have understood what was meant by "suck it up", by the way.;)
    I guess it is just AE then. I've heard and used it all my life.

    The Urban Dictionary's definition of the phrase seems spot-on to me: "To endure a period of mental, physical, or emotional hardship with no complaining."

    I don't think there is anything vulgar about it, by the way.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    If the weather is really bad, and I have to live in a city, can I say:

    The weather is horrible here in winter but I have to rough it!
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Not really.
    We can't afford a good hotel so we'll have to rough it in an apartment.
    The villa doesn't have enough bedrooms so we can take it in turns to rough it in the living room.
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    Interesting thread, and by the way, how do I post a reply with that blue rectangle that always mentions others' replies?

    See you!
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Click "Reply with Quote" in the bottom-right corner of a post.

    "Tough it out," as in post 6, was the first term that came to my mind.
     
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