rough jacket

ktm

Senior Member
Could anyone be so kind to inform me whether "rough jacket" in the sentence below should be translated literally or it is any special kind of clothing?

----
He wore a rough jacket with trousers to match.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Could anyone be so kind to inform me whether "rough jacket" in the sentence below should be translated literally or it is any special kind of clothing?

    ----
    He wore a rough jacket with trousers to match.
    Some context might tell us more - I suspect it means a well-worn, sort of shabby jacket.
     

    ktm

    Senior Member
    The context is as follows:
    ---
    He wore a rough jacket with trousers to match. At his throat a cravat was tied which had a design of foxes capering about. He was clad more like a countryman than a London reporter.
    ---
    These sentences are dropped into completely different text. That is the whole context available.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    The context is as follows:
    ---
    He wore a rough jacket with trousers to match. At his throat a cravat was tied which had a design of foxes capering about. He was clad more like a countryman than a London reporter.
    ---
    These sentences are dropped into completely different text. That is the whole context available.
    That helps, KTM. The last line gives us a hint that he dressed like someone from the country - I would imagine he probably had on a well-worn suit (hence, pants to match) and looked more like a farmer than a city reporter. Imagine someone from the country who doesn't much care about fashion and whose suit is probably old-fashioned and a touch shabby.
     

    anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    When I read the sentence, my first thought was that he was wearing tweed (which is rough to the touch).

    I'll defer to the BE speakers on this one, though, since the man appears to be British.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I don't think "rough" here necessarily means that the jacket is shoddy or old. I believe it just describes a fabric that is not very smooth.
    Neither do I. I think it was of coarse material, i.e. woven from thick, probably woolIen, fibres such as the tweeds that a countryman is wont to wear: very comfortable and warm. Rough is the opposited of smooth as would be a jacket of gaberdine or serge.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Neither do I. I think it was of coarse material, i.e. woven from thick, probably woolIen, fibres such as the tweeds that a countryman is wont to wear: very comfortable and warm. Rough is the opposited of smooth as would be a jacket of gabardine or serge.

    Americans can never sound this British.

    Americans would not use "wont", "opposited" or spell it "fibres"; "gabardine" and "serge" would be out of the question too.

    Notwithstanding, I would assume that "rough" would mean a heavy woolen coat more suited for the rigors of outdoor work than city life. The kind of coat a seaman or a farm worker would wear, and not a barrister (just trying to sound a bit British).
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Opposited was a typing error, but you missed woollen with two L's (your version is right as a more frequent alternative in Britain too). As Goethe said (in German), "Every bear growls according to the cave in which he was born", and as Chuchill remarked (who had an American mum/mom), we are two nations divided by a common language
    PS It wouldn't affect the material of the jacket, except for a leather patch where the shotgun-butt goes, but I just had the idea that it might have something to do with rough-shooting viz: http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=561511175 , though hitherto I have only heard such a garment described as a shooting jacket.
     
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