round-shouldered, slouch

< Previous | Next >

KYC

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hello, there:
I stumble across a phrase "round shoulders".
It reminds me a word "slouch" I learnt.

i am wondering how to use them respectively.
For example:
1. She always stands in a round-shouldered way.
2. Watch your posture! Don't slouch.
3. Mom said I am a little round-shouldered.

I am wondering if my usage of the terms is idiomatic nad natural.
May I have your verification?
Thanks a lot!
 
  • MJSinLondon

    Senior Member
    English - UK (London)
    Hello, there:
    I stumble across a phrase "round shoulders".
    It reminds me a word "slouch" I learnt.

    i am wondering how to use them respectively.
    For example:
    1. She always stands in a round-shouldered way.:cross:
    2. Watch your posture! Don't slouch. :tick:
    3. Mom said I am a little round-shouldered.:tick:

    I am wondering if my usage of the terms is idiomatic nad natural.
    May I have your verification?
    Thanks a lot!
     

    KYC

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thanks a lot for your correction!
    So can you tell me what the correct sentence is?
    Thank again!
     

    KYC

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thanks for your confirmation.
    I am wondering why 1 is not right.
    Is it right if I change it into: He always stands in a round-shouldered gesture.?
    May I have your clarification, please?
    Thanks a lot!
     
    Last edited:

    MJSinLondon

    Senior Member
    English - UK (London)
    We simply don't use 'round-shouldered' in this way. You can't do something in a 'round-shouldered' way. And a 'round-shouldered gesture' doesn't make sense.

    A child may appear a little round-shouldered. Perhaps a physiotherapist could give him some exercises to strengthen his muscles/shoulders/ whatever (I'm not an expert in this field!).
     

    KYC

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thanks for your correction.
    If possible, could native speakers set more examples about the usage of rould shouldered?
    If I would like to say someone is rould -shouldered whenever he/ she sits or stands, I am wondering how I should express it.

    Thanks a lot!
     

    MJSinLondon

    Senior Member
    English - UK (London)
    Hi again KYC

    I might say "When I was about 6 I had to do special exercises because my mother thought I was becoming round shouldered".

    But round shouldered is an expression that is rarely heard in everyday conversation. It is essentially limited to discussions about the development of children, and even there I don't think it is an 'official' medical term. It indicates that the child isn't really standing up straight and his shoulders are slightly rounded. I don't think I've ever heard it used to describe an adult.

    On the other hand, the word slouch, as in 'he looks very tired these days - he always seems to be slouched across his desk' is a colloquial, although slightly perjorative, word. But avoid using it in formal written English
     
    I've often heard round-shouldered used about elderly people, but not in the hearing of those afflicted by the condition, as it's very insensitive to draw attention to it.

    To me, it's a gradual, progressive and incurable deformity of the spine which some unfortunate sufferers have to endure late in life.



    Rover
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Weightlifters use the term "round shoulders". If you do an excessive amount of chest exercises and very little for the opposing muscles in the back then the chest muscles will pull the shoulders forward making for "round shoulders". This is different from a slouch in that the shoulders are brought forward instead of the neck and shoulders bending towards the front.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    On the other hand, the word slouch, as in 'he looks very tired these days - he always seems to be slouched across his desk' is a colloquial, although slightly perjorative, word. But avoid using it in formal written English
    Where I come from, you can slouch in your seat but you can't slouch across your desk. :) (And now I'm going to spend the rest of the day trying to imagine that.)
     

    MJSinLondon

    Senior Member
    English - UK (London)
    Where I come from, you can slouch in your seat but you can't slouch across your desk. :) (And now I'm going to spend the rest of the day trying to imagine that.)
    ...I've often told pupils to 'sit up properly and not slouch across your desk'! But I fully admit it's colloquial and somewhat inelegant language!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top