rubbing my arms where bruises had marbled them

Kitty 123

Member
Chinese
Hi, guys.
I recently came across this sentence when reading an article and I am not quite clear about what it means.
Its source is listed as follows.

Source: New York Times, March 29, 2012
Title: Getting to That Safe Place
Author: Elisabeth Fairfield Stokes


Sentence: I met him at the coffee place where I was working after I’d dropped out of graduate school out West, many states and several states of mind away from the New England college town to which I’d returned. I was floating between Gen X jobs, living in the aftermathof an emotionally and physically abusive relationship that had left me dazed and shaky, still absently rubbing my arms where bruises had marbled them, unable to look much in mirrors because I felt exposed, vulnerable.

Q: How to understand "marble" here? Does it mean that "her bruises look like marbles, the colored lines..." or "these bruises have been stiff"?

Thank you!
 
  • busitrans

    Member
    Chinese
    Hello, everyone. I read an article titled "Get to That Safe Place" on New York Times about modern love by Elisabeth Fairfield Stokes. Several people have asked questions about it (I have read all the posts about it, even the one explaining the location of the graduate school), but there is still something I don't quite understand. Many thanks for your help.

    I was floating between Gen X jobs, living in the aftermath of an emotionally and physically abusive relationship that had left me dazed and shaky, still absently rubbing my arms where bruises had marbled them, unable to look much in mirrors because I felt exposed, vulnerable.

    What does "marble" mean here? Its three common meanings are not suitable for the context. Does it mean "hurt" or something else?

    Many thanks for your help.

    << Now merged with an earlier thread. :) >>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Marbled here is a discoloration, or mix of colours, just as we talk about a piece of meat being marbled with fat -- the meat is red, the fat is white ... a mix of colours, each of which is still individually identifiable.
     

    busitrans

    Member
    Chinese
    It occurred to me just now that the sentence means that there are many bruises on my arms, and the bruises are evenly distributed on my arms. Is it so? Thank you.
     

    busitrans

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much, Copyright.

    I read your answer in another post, but I don't quite understand it.

    Is my comprehension reasonable? I derive it from the second meaning of "marble" as a verb: to evenly match the thin meat and the fatty meat.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Many bruises, not necessarily evenly distributed, but identifiable with perhaps dark bruising and yellow bruising and white flesh. I would rather not link to photos of marbled bruises, so how about a marble cake, which is colored in random patterns along the same principle. :)
     

    busitrans

    Member
    Chinese
    Many thanks for your patience and explanations, Copyright. You are really warm-hearted and benefiting many people.
     
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